Cornicello

Joseph J. Capista’s poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Slate, and the Hopkins Review. He lives with his family in Baltimore and teaches writing at Towson University.

Cello

Bruce Bond is the author of fifteen books including For the Lost Cathedral (LSU Press, 2015) and The Other Sky (Etruscan Press, 2015). Four new books are forthcoming: Immanent Distance: Poetry and the Metaphysics of the Near at Hand (University of Michigan Press); Black Anthem (Tampa Review Prize, University of Tampa Press); Gold Bee, winner of the Crab Orchard Open Competition Award (Southern Illinois University Press); and Sacrum (Four Way Books). He holds a Regents Professorship at the University of North Texas.

I Impugn a Victorian

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Vanishing Point at Willapa Bay

Christine Robbins, who is making her third appearance in our pages, has poems published or forthcoming in Barrow Street, the Missouri Review online, Willow Springs, and elsewhere. She received an MFA in creative writing from the Rainier Writing Workshop and has lived in Olympia, Washington, for most of her life.

Metaphor

David Swanger has published four books of poetry, two chapbooks, and poems in various anthologies and journals. His awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council. His most recent book, Wayne’s College of Beauty (2006), won the John Ciardi Poetry Prize.

Snoring

Fleda Brown’s The Woods Are On Fire: New & Selected Poems will be out from the University of Nebraska Press in 2017. A former poet laureate of Delaware, she lives in Traverse City, Michigan, and is on the faculty of the Rainier Writing Workshop, a low-residency MFA program in Tacoma, Washington. 

Survivor

David Moolten’s most recent book, Primitive Mood (2009), won the T. S. Eliot Prize from Truman State University Press. Moolten is also the author of Especially Then (David Robert Books, 2005), and Plums & Ashes (Northeastern University, 1994), which won the Samuel French Morse Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Poetry, the Kenyon Review, the Southwest Review, and Epoch, among other journals and reviews.

Richer Than Prayer or Vow (a chapbook)

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

Trombones, Not Magic

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.