The Answer

Ty Sassaman’s work in this issue is his first publication. Sassaman is a first-year MFA student at Butler University and runs Just One Question, a single-question interview project. His self-published memoir, “Just One Question: My Road Trip Interview with America,” will debut in late 2016.

The Delight of Making Up Gods; Elegy for Galway, Late October; Vanilla and Banana-Peanut Butter; Hub; The Truth of One Short Poem; & Fjord

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press. 

Almandal Grimoire: The Book as Magical Object

Genese Grill holds a BFA from Cooper Union in painting, and an MA and PhD from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in Germanic literatures and languages. She is the author of The World as Metaphor in Robert Musil’s “The Man without Qualities”: Possibility as Reality (Camden House, 2012) and the translator of a collection of Musil’s short prose, Thought Flights (2015); his short-story collection Unions (2019); and Theater Symptoms: Robert Musil’s Plays and Writings on Theater (forthcoming)—with these three all from Contra Mundum. Her literary essays, translator introductions, and scholarly writing have appeared in The Georgia Review, Numero Cinq (where she is on the masthead as special correspondent), Hyperion: On the Future of Aesthetics, the Missouri Review, and elsewhere. Her completed, as-yet-unpublished collection of essays celebrates the relationship between matter and spirit.

on The Great Medieval Yellows by Emily Wilson

Adam Day is the author of Model of a City in Civil War (Sarabande Books, 2015), and is the recipient of both a PSA Chapbook Fellowship for Badger, Apocrypha and a PEN Emerging Writers Award. His work has appeared in the Boston Review, Lana Turner, APR, AGNI, the Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He coordinates the Baltic Writing Residency in Sweden, Scotland, and Kentucky’s Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest.

The Wild Unsayable: Magic, Mystery, and Ambiguity in Contemporary Poetry (on Mark Doty’s Deep Lane; Alberto Ríos’ A Small Story About the Sky; Jill Bialosky’s The Players; and Joanna Klink’s Excerpts from a Secret Prophecy)

Kevin Clark’s several books of poems include the forthcoming The Consecrations (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2021). His first collection, In the Evening of No Warning (New Issues Poetry and Prose, 2002), earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets, and his second, Self-Portrait with Expletives (2010), won the Pleiades Press prize. His poetry appears in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, and Crazyhorse. A regular critic for The Georgia Review, he’s also published essays in the Southern Review, Papers on Language and Literature, and Contemporary Literary Criticism. He teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop. 

Noonday and a Deep Idea of Yellow

Pattiann Rogers has published fourteen books of poetry, most recently Holy Heathen Rhapsody (Penguin, 2013), and a selection of her uncollected poems is forthcoming from Penguin/Random House in 2018. A gathering of 329 journals and magazines containing her poems was recently acquired by Texas Tech University and is housed in the Sowell Family Collection in Literature, Community, and the Natural World.

Source

Robert Cording has published eight collections of poems, most recently Only So Far (CavanKerry Press, 2015) and A Word in My Mouth: Selected Spiritual Poems (Wipf and Stock, 2013). He has received two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships in poetry and two poetry grants from the Connecticut Commission of the Arts. His poems have appeared in numerous publications such as the Nation, the Southern Review, Poetry, the Hudson Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Orion, and the New Yorker.

No Return

Richard Jackson has published fifteen books of poems and is the author or editor of multiple critical monographs, books in translation, and anthologies. His most recent books are Broken Horizons (Press 53, 2018) and Out of Place (Ashland Poetry Press, 2014); “Take Five,” a prose poetry project with four other poets, is forthcoming.

She Gathers Rocks

Derek Sheffield’s poetry collection Through the Second Skin (Orchises Press, 2013) was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His work has also appeared recently in the Gettysburg Review, the Southern Review, and AGNI. He lives with his family on the east slopes of the Cascades and is the poetry editor of Terrain.org.