Octopus

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of four books of poetry, most recently, Oceanic (Copper Canyon Press, 2018). She was recently named a 2020 Guggenheim Fellow. Her writing appears in Poetry, The New York Times Magazine, ESPN, and Tin House. Her book of illustrated nature essays is forthcoming with Milkweed Editions. She serves as poetry faculty for the Writing Workshops in Greece and is professor of English and creative writing in the University of Mississippi’s MFA program.

Etymology, Ecology, and Ecopoetics

As an expression of local, state, and regional inequities, environmental racism is a feedback loop of enhanced health risks, restricted job opportunities, diminished educational success, and negative social relations for certain populations due to zoning policies, industrial interests, and business/governmental …

Tyrone Williams teaches literature and theory at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the author of several chapbooks and six books of poetry: As Iz (Omnidawn, 2018), Howell (Atelos Books, 2011), Adventures of Pi (Dos Madres Press, 2011), The Hero Project of the Century (The Backwaters Press, 2009), On Spec (Omnidawn, 2008), and c.c. (Krupskaya, 2002). A limited-edition art project, Trump l’oeil, was published by Hostile Books in 2017. He and Jeanne Heuving edited the anthology Inciting Poetics (University of New Mexico Press, 2019). 

The Gospel of Good Roads: A Letter to the American Farmer

Bryan Head is a poet from Asheville, North Carolina, who is currently completing an MFA at the University of Maryland. His work has appeared in the New England Review. He is the editor of the Sakura Review, and he co-manages HomeWord Youth Poetry, a spoken-word poetry organization in Asheville.

The Citizenship Question

Jenni(f)fer Tamayo is a queer, migrant, and formerly undocumented poet, essayist, and performer. Her poetry collections include To Kill the Future in the Present (Green Lantern Press, 2018), You Da One (Noemi Press, 2017), and [Red Missed Aches] (Switchback Books, 2011). Currently, JT lives and works on Ohlone and Patwin lands and is pursuing her PhD in performance studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research explores how contemporary Black and Indigenous poets use vocal practices to counternarrate histories of colonial violence.

If I Ever Get My Citizenship Papers

Aline Mello is a Brazilian writer and editor living in Atlanta. She is an Undocupoet fellow, and her work has been published or is forthcoming in Atlanta Review, The New Republic, Grist, and elsewhere.

Ticking the Box

Autumn McClintock lives in Philadelphia and works at a public library. Her poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in The Account, Cimarron Review, Denver Quarterly, Permafrost, Sonora Review, Spoon River Poetry Review, and others. She is a staff reader for Ploughshares and the associate poetry editor of Doubleback Review.

The Second Front Door

Joshua Weiner is the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Figure of a Man Being Swallowed by a Fish (University of Chicago Press, 2013); he is also the editor of At the Barriers: On the Poetry of Thom Gunn (University of Chicago Press, 2009). “Berlin Notebook,” his chronicle reporting on the refugee crisis in Berlin, was supported with a Guggenheim fellowship and published by Los Angeles Review of Books in 2016 as a digital edition. Trumpoems (2018) is a chapbook available as a free digital edition from Dispatches from the Poetry Wars. His translation with Linda B. Parshall of Nelly Sachs’s Flight & Metamorphosis will be published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in 2021.

Frutos Extraños

Karen Tei Yamashita is the author of seven books, including I Hotel (2010), finalist for the National Book Award, and the forthcoming Sansei & Sensibility (2020), all published by Coffee House Press. Recipient of the John Dos Passos Prize for Literature and a U.S. Artists Ford Foundation Fellowship, she is professor emerita of literature and creative writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Displaced Farmers, Refugee Seeds: Why Syrians and Kurds Aren’t Going Back “Home” from Lebanon

Gary Paul Nabhan is a Lebanese-American and Ecumenical Franciscan Brother who was hosted in Lebanon by American University in Beirut in 2018. A MacArthur Fellow and award-winning essayist, he is working on a novel about his family’s flight from Syria a century ago. Nabhan has authored and edited more than thirty-five books on the natural history and ecology of the American Southwest and the importance of nurturing cultural diversity to preserve biodiversity. One of the co-authors of the manifesto “An Invitation to the Radical Center” (2003), his most recent books include Mesquite (Chelsea Green, 2018) and Food from the Radical Center: Healing Our Land and Communities (Island Press, 2018).