Once in a While I Gave Up

 

Once in a while I gave up, and let myself 

remember how much I’d liked the way my ex’s

hips were set, the head of the femur which

rode, not shallow, not deep, in the socket 

of the pelvis,

Sharon Olds is the author of eleven volumes of poetry, most recently Stag’s Leap (Knopf, 2012), which was awarded the T. S. Eliot Prize and the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Her next collection, Odes, is due out shortly, also from Knopf. Named New York State Poet Laureate from 1998–2000, Olds teaches in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at New York University and is one of the founders of NYU’s writing workshops for residents of Goldwater Hospital and for veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. A Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science, she was awarded the Donald Hall–Jane Kenyon Prize in American Poetry in 2014, and was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2015.

We Are All of Us Passing Through

I came through Monarch Pass in Colorado, fifteen thousand feet high and fourteen miles out of the nearest town—I came through on a 650cc Triumph motorcycle about dusk dark in late September of 1958. It was snowing lightly. I was …

Harry Crews (1935–2012), born in Bacon County, was the author of nearly twenty novels, from The Gospel Singer (1968) to An American Family: The Baby with the Curious Markings (2006). His published nonfiction includes the first volume of his autobiography, A Childhood: The Biography of a Place (1978), and three essay collections. His papers are collected in the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Georgia; he was the subject of a special feature, including previously unpublished work and letters culled from that collection, in our Winter 2007 issue. Crews lived for decades in Gainesville, Florida, where he taught at the University of Florida. (Inducted in 2002)