Identifying with Valentine: An Interview with Anya Silver

 

Gale Marie Thompson (GMT): “Valentine Godé-Darel (1873–1915): Five Paintings by Ferdinand Hodler,” takes a different approach to chronology. Can you explain the creation of this poem, and its relationship to time?

Anya Silver (AS): I first saw Swiss painter …

Staying Put and Unsprawling

Spring is finally returning to Athens, Georgia, with dogwood, azalea and, more to the point here, the annual Georgia Review Earth Day Celebration. This year’s guest speaker is Scott Russell Sanders, a writer of skill and probity—and of the …

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

Valentine Godé-Darel (1873–1915): Five Paintings by Ferdinand Hodler

This beautiful head, this whole body, like a Byzantine empress on the mosaics of Ravenna—and this nose, this mouth—and the eyes, they too, those wonderful eyes—all these the worms will eat. And nothing will remain, absolutely nothing!

—Hodler, letter to

Anya Silver (1968–2018) published four books of poetry, and her work has appeared widely. In 2018 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry. The poems in this issue are from “Saint Agnostica,” a manuscript Silver completed just before her death in August 2018 after more than a decade of battling breast cancer.

Black Plank

Every few minutes, my father pushes out of his armchair to take a tour of his house. He stops at the desk I’ve made of the table off the kitchen and flips through my books. He asks me again what …

Nancy Geyer’s writing has appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Gulf Coast, and the Iowa Review, among other places. She is the recipient of the Iron Horse Literary Review’s 2012 Discovered Voices Award for Nonfiction, Chautauqua’s 2012 Flash Writing Prize, and the Iowa Review’s 2008 Award in Nonfiction. She lives in Washington, DC, and is finishing her MFA in creative writing in the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University.

Agnostic Ecstasy: A Conversation with Coleman Barks

On the last evening in January 2013, I had the good fortune to stop by Coleman Barks’s home in Athens to interview him about his long poem “The VOICE inside WATER,” which appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of The

C. J. Bartunek received her PhD in English from the University of Georgia and her BA from the University of Southern California. Her writing has appeared in The Smart SetPacific StandardThe Big Roundtable, and elsewhere.