A Flash and an Hour (on The Calfbearer by Ida Affleck Graves; Fire & Flower by Laura Kasischke; Donkey Gospel by Tony Hoagland; The Old Liberators: New and Selected Poems and Translations by Robert Hedin; & Extranjera by Lola Haskins)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

What We Talk About When We Talk About “Science” (on Cultural Boundaries of Science: Credibility on the Line by Thomas F. Gieryn; Muddling Through: Pursuing Science and Truths in the 21st Century by Michael Fortun and Herbert J. Bernstein; and The Truth Of Uncertainty: Beyond Ideology in Science and Literature by Edward L. Galligan)

Once I Was a Block of Stone: Six Recent Chapbooks (on Epic Journeys, Unbelievable Escapes by Steve Kowit; A Different Kind of Hunger by Beth Ann Fennelly; Take Hold by Merrill Leffler; The Memory Palace by Colin Hamilton; Hand-Me-down Calicos by L. Teresa Church; and At The Dead Center of Day by Walter Bargen)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

Man Walks into a Bar (on Park City: New and Selected Stories by Ann Beattie; Final Vinyl Days and Other Stories by Jill McCorkle; Soon: Tales from Hospice by A. G. Mojtabai; and Birds of America by Lorrie Moore)

Erin McGraw is the author of six books, most recently the novel Better Food for a Better World (Slant Books, 2013). Her stories and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, The Atlantic, STORY, the Southern Review, Allure, and other magazines and journals. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, the poet Andrew Hudgins.

 

A Matter of Days Before the Collapse

Leaving

Confessional Poet & In Which Being Here Together Is Enough

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Floaters

Dave Smith is the Elliott Coleman Professor of Poetry in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. His newest book of poems, Hawks on Wires, is forthcoming from LSU Press this fall. Along with Robert DeMott, he edited the essay anthology Afield: Writers on Bird Dogs (Skyhorse Press, 2010).

October Incident, 1998

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.