Objects in This Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear

Richard Jackson has published fifteen books of poems and is the author or editor of multiple critical monographs, books in translation, and anthologies. His most recent books are Broken Horizons (Press 53, 2018) and Out of Place (Ashland Poetry Press, 2014); “Take Five,” a prose poetry project with four other poets, is forthcoming.

History

Idiot Savant: Henry Ford as Proto-Postmodern Man

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

Sea-Wrack Religion

“Bursting Under the Window, Inconsolable”: Five Recent Chapbooks (on 3 Marbles by Judith Kerman; Kissing the Bees by John Sokol; Surge by Matthew Cooperman; Bukowski Boulevard by Joan Jobe Smith; and The Last Campaign by Rachel Loden)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

The Subjective Correlative (on A Saturday Night at the Flying Dog and Other Poems by Marcia Southwick; Then, Suddenly by Lynn Emanuel; In the Surgical Theatre by Dana Levin; Swarm by Jorie Graham; and Lifelines: Selected Poems, 1950-1999 by Philip Booth)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Brute Force: Violent Stories (on What Salmon Know by Elwood Reid; How Animals Mate by Daniel Mueller; The Wonders of the Invisible World by David Gates; Poachers: Stories by Tom Franklin; and Close Range: Wyoming Stories by Annie Proulx)

Erin McGraw is the author of six books, most recently the novel Better Food for a Better World (Slant Books, 2013). Her stories and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, The Atlantic, STORY, the Southern Review, Allure, and other magazines and journals. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, the poet Andrew Hudgins.

 

The Last Place Where Birds Live

Tides

Kent Nelson has identified 767 species of North American birds and has traveled to the most remote areas of the U.S. and Canada, including Attu (the last Aleutian Island), the Dry Tortugas, and Newfoundland. His story collection, The Spirit Bird (University of Pittsburgh Press), won the 2014 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. “Out of the Darkness” is one of seven linked works in a collection-in-progress, “Charleston Stories,” three of which have appeared in The Georgia Review. He lives in Ouray, Colorado.