Eye of Beholder; Moonology; Fahrenheit 451; Alteration; & Jan. 31st: Degrees of the Same Thing

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

Space

Kevin Brockmeier is the author of nine books, including The Ghost Variations: One Hundred Stories (Pantheon, 2020), from which the three stories in this issue are taken. Some of his earlier contributions to The Georgia Review were reprinted in the Best American Short Stories and O. Henry Prize Stories anthologies. His work has been translated into eighteen languages. He teaches frequently at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was raised.

Ode to Ordinariness

Robert Cording has published eight collections of poems, most recently Only So Far (CavanKerry Press, 2015) and A Word in My Mouth: Selected Spiritual Poems (Wipf and Stock, 2013). He has received two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships in poetry and two poetry grants from the Connecticut Commission of the Arts. His poems have appeared in numerous publications such as the Nation, the Southern Review, Poetry, the Hudson Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Orion, and the New Yorker.

Dancing in Alabama

Preparatory Meditation; Touch Me Not; & The Coronary Garden

Damage

A Jeweler’s Eye for Flaw

In Development No. 3

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

The Trains

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

Past Issues

Summer 2022

Spring 2022

Winter 2021

Fall 2021

Summer 2021

Spring 2021

Winter 2020

Fall 2020

Summer 2020

Spring 2020

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