Blunt

The Burden

Eternal City

Kathleen Graber’s second poetry collection, The Eternal City (Princeton University Press, 2010), was a finalist for the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the William Carlos Williams Award. She teaches in the creative writing program at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Annabel Before the War: Only What I See

The Sabbatical

Cathy Smith Bowers’ collections of poetry include Like Shining from Shook Foil (2010), The Candle I Hold Up to See You (2009), and A Book of Minutes (2004), and her poems have appeared in publications such as Poetry, the Southern Review, Kenyon Review, and Ploughshares. For many years the poet-in-residence at Queens University of Charlotte, Bowers currently teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Queens and in the Haden Institute Spiritual Direction and Dream Leadership programs. From 2010 to 2012, she was poet laureate of North Carolina.

Carker

The Best and the Briefest (on The O. Henry Prize Stories 2007: The Best Stories of the Year, edited by Laura Furman; New Stories from the South: 2006—The Year’s Best, edited by Allan Gurganus; Best New American Voices 2007: Fresh Fiction from the Top Writing Programs, edited by Sue Miller; Flash Fiction Forward: 80 Very Short Stories, edited by James Thomas and Robert Shapard; and New Sudden Fiction: Short-Short Stories from America and Beyond, edited by Robert Shapard and James Thomas)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Raindrops on Roses . . . (on The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 by Albert Goldbarth; Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems, 1986–2006 by Carl Phillips; Earthly Meditations: New and Selected Poems by Robert Wrigley; Deep Light: New and Selected Poems, 1987–2007 by Rebecca McClanahan; The Corpse Flower: New and Selected Poems by Bruce Beasley; Crossing to Sunlight Revisited: New and Selected Poems by Paul Zimmer; and Recounting the Seasons: Poems, 1958–2005 by John Engels)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

American Theater Watch, 2006–2007

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.