Three Girls (Fall 2002)

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of some one hundred books in multiple genres, including the novel Little Bird of Heaven (2009), the story collection Sourland (2010), and the memoir A Widow’s Story (2011), all from Ecco. The 2010 recipient of the Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement of the National Book Critics Circle, Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978. Oates’s “Ballerina” appeared in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

Rembrandt’s Bones (Winter 1999)

Phyllis Moore is the author of the short-story collection A Compendium of Skirts (Carroll & Graf, 2002). Her work has been short-listed in the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies, and she has been the recipient of numerous Florida and Illinois arts council grants. She received her PhD in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is a former co-chair of the MFA in writing program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is now the director of the School of Liberal Arts at the Kansas City Art Institute, where she teaches literature and writing and conducts the school’s Paris study abroad program.

Light Opera (Summer 1995)

Lee Martin, who teaches in the MFA program at Ohio State University, is the author of five novels, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Bright Forever (Shaye Areheart Books, 2005). His most recent book is a story collection, The Mutual UFO Network (Dzanc Books, 2018).

The Mappist (Spring 2000)

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.

Knife, Barn, My Harvey (Spring 2007)

René Houtrides’ stories have appeared in The Georgia Review (Spring 2007), New Ohio Review, and Mississippi Review. Her play Calamity Jane was produced at New York City’s Wonderhorse Theater, nearly a dozen of her essays have aired on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, and her freelance work has appeared in the New York Times. Born and raised near Manhattan’s Little Italy and Chinatown, she has an MFA in writing from Bard College and is on the faculty of the Juilliard School’s drama division.

Virga (Fall 2000)

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.

Stories About the Boys (Fall 1984, Summer 1993, Summer 2001)

Jim Heynen’s short-short stories have appeared frequently in The Georgia Review. A new collection of his short-shorts, Ordinary Sins: After Theophrastus, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2014. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

I Hate to See That Evening Sun Go Down (Fall 1998)

William Gay’s “I Hate to See That Evening Sun Go Down” was his first-ever publication when it appeared in The Georgia Review in Fall 1998. It became the title piece of his short-fiction collection, published by the Free Press in 2002, and it inspired a feature film—titled That Evening Sun—written and produced in 2009 by Georgia native Scott Teems and starring Hal Holbrook. Gay is also the author of three novels and is at work on others in his Hohenwald, Tennessee, home.

Wanting Only to Be Heard (Winter 1987)

Jack Driscoll’s latest collection, The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot (Wayne State University Press, 2017), received the 2018 Michigan Library Foundation Award for fiction. His forthcoming “New & Selected” will include eleven stories previously published in The Georgia Review and dating back to 1987. He currently teaches in Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program in Oregon.

Past Issues

Summer 2022

Spring 2022

Winter 2021

Fall 2021

Summer 2021

Spring 2021

Winter 2020

Fall 2020

Summer 2020

Spring 2020

Newsletter