The Dialogic Self (on The Formal Method in Literary Scholarship by M. M. Bakhtin, P. M. Medvedev, Albert Wehrle, and Wlad Godzich; Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics. Theory and History of Literature Series #8 by M. M. Bakhtin, P. M. Medvedev, and Caryl Emerson; Mikhail Bakhtin: The Dialogic Principle. Theory and History of Literature Series #13 by Tzvetan Todorov and Wlad Godzich; Mikhail Bakhtin by Katerina Clark and Michael Holquist; The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays By Mikhail Bakhtin by Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist; & Rabelais and His World by Mikhail Bakhtin and Helene Iswolsky)

Richard Jackson has published fifteen books of poems and is the author or editor of multiple critical monographs, books in translation, and anthologies. His most recent books are Broken Horizons (Press 53, 2018) and Out of Place (Ashland Poetry Press, 2014); “Take Five,” a prose poetry project with four other poets, is forthcoming.

Short Fiction in the Eighties (on Under the Wheat by Rick DeMarinis; The Lover of Horses by Tess Gallagher; Going to See the Leaves by Linda Collins; Tigers in the Wood by Rebecca Kavaler; & Dancing in the Movies by Robert Boswell)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Realism, Death, and Philosophy (on Talking to Strangers by Patricia Dobler; Day of The Body by Carol Frost; Skating with Heather Grace by Thomas Lynch; The Language Student by Bin Ramke; As Long As You’re Happy by Jack Myers)

The Age of Great Vocations

Once Upon a Time

Lee K. Abbott is the author of seven collections of short fiction, most recently All Things, All at Once: New & Selected Stories (W. W. Norton, 2006). His work has appeared ten times previously in The Georgia Review and in nearly one hundred other periodicals, including the Atlantic, Harper’s, Epoch, Southern Review, and Boulevard. His work has also been featured in Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Awards: Prize Stories, Best of the West, and the Pushcart Prize. Twice a winner of National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Abbott is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor in English at Ohio State University, where he directs the MFA program in creative writing. “The Final Proof of Fate and Circumstance,” the first of Abbott’s eight stories to appear in GR (Fall 1983), was included in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

The Kisser and Teller

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

At Shannon’s Creek, Early August

A Ripple of Deer, A Metamorphosis of Bear, A Metaphor of Mountains

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

The Land of the Dead

David Wagoner has published nineteen books of poems—most recently After the Point of No Return (Copper Canyon Press, 2012)—and ten novels, including The Escape Artist (1965), which Francis Ford Coppola made into a movie in 1982. Winner of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize and many other honors, he was a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets for twenty-three years, edited Poetry Northwest from 1966 to 2002, and is professor emeritus of English at the University of Washington. He teaches in the low-residency MFA program of the Whidbey Island Writers Workshop.