Flip Cards

Semicentennial Retrospections: The Past as Perspective

Meeting Miss Porter

Ape Dreams

Actual Field Conditions

James Kilgo (1941–2002) was born in Darlington, South Carolina. He graduated from Wofford College, then went on to receive his MA and PhD in American Literature from Tulane University. In 1967 he joined the faculty of the English department at the University of Georgia, where he remained until his retirement in 1999. Though he didn’t begin his creative writing career until he was well into his 30s, by the time he died in 2002 Kilgo had become an author both critically acclaimed and widely-read. His books include the essay collections Deep Enough for Ivorybills (1988) and Inheritance of Horses (1994); the Townsend Prize–winning novel Daughter of My People (1998); and the posthumously released autobiographical travel narrative Colors of Africa (2003). He also wrote The Blue Wall: Wilderness of the Carolinas and Georgia (1996) in collaboration with photographer Thomas Wyche, and in 1999 published the memoir The Hand-Carved Creche and Other Christmas Stories. (Inducted in 2011)

Invisible Shadows: Self-Reliance and Authority

From Outside, In

Beacons Burning Down

on The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.