on The Hopper Light by David Rigsbee

on Home Economics by Wendell Berry

on The Collected Letters of William Morris. Volume I, Volume IIA, Volume IIB by Norman Kelvin

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

on The Ascetic Imperative in Culture and Criticism by Geoffrey Galt Harpham

Notes Toward a Better Fiction (on Prize Stories 1988: The O. Henry Awards by William Abrahams; The Best American Short Stories, 1988 by Mark Helprin; & New Stories from the South: The Year’s Best, 1988 by Shannon Ravenel)

Cultural Power (on Highbrow/Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America by Lawrence W. Levine & Boxed In: The Culture of TV by Mark Crispin Miller)

Loners Whose Voices Move (on Yellow Glove by Naomi Shihab Nye; Further Adventures With You by C. D. Wright; Descendant by Marianne Boruch; & Out in the Open by Margaret Gibson)

What Brings Us Out

Naomi Shihab Nye’s most recent books are Famous (Wings Press, 2015), illustrated by Lisa Desimini, and The Turtle of Oman (Greenwillow, 2014). Nye has held Lannan, Guggenheim, and Witter Bynner fellowships, and she has won a Lavan Award from the Academy of American Poets, the Isabella Gardner Poetry Award, the Paterson Poetry Prize, four Pushcart Prizes, the Robert Creeley Prize, “The Betty Prize” from Poets House for service to poetry, and two Jane Addams Children’s Book Awards.

Lessons of the Past

Judith Ortiz Cofer (1952–2016), as a young girl, emigrated with her family from Puerto Rico to Paterson, New Jersey; when she was a teenager her family relocated to Augusta. Ortiz Cofer was the author of several novels, including If I Could Fly (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011), Call Me Maria (2004), and The Line of the Sun (1989); poetry collections such as A Love Story Beginning in Spanish (2005), Reaching for the Mainland (1995), and Terms of Survival (1987); a memoir, The Cruel Country (UGA Press, 2015); two essay collections, Lessons From a Writer’s Life (Heinemann Books, 2011) and Woman in Front of the Sun: On Becoming a Writer (2000); and many other works, including three children’s titles with Piñata Books / Arte Público Press—¡A Bailar! (2011), The Poet Upstairs (2012), and Animal Jamboree / La fiesta de los animales (2012). Ortiz Cofer’s work appeared in The Georgia Review, Southern Review, the Kenyon Review, Glamour, and many other periodicals, as well as in numerous textbooks and anthologies. Ortiz Cofer, who in 2010 was inducted into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, was the Regents’ and Franklin Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Georgia.