on A Howard Nemerov Reader by Howard Nemerov

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.

Every Poet in His Humor (on Narcissus Dreaming by Dabney Stuart; The Past, The Future, The Present: Poems Selected and New by Reed Whittemore; Distance from Loved Ones by James Tate; Popular Culture by Albert Goldbarth; Why We Live with Animals by Alvin Greenberg; Collected Poems: 1939-1989 by William Jay Smith; & The Death of Cock Robin by W. D. Snodgrass)

The Calm Between the Storms (on The Rushdie File by Lisa Appignanesi and Sara Maitland; Salman Rushdie: Sentenced to Death by W. J. Weatherby; A Satanic Affair: Salman Rushdie and the Rage of Islam by Malise Ruthven; & The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West by Daniel Pipes)

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

Novellas for the Nineties (on A Theftby Saul Bellow; The Bellarosa Connection by Saul Bellow; I Lock My Door Upon Myself by Joyce Carol Oates; American Earthquakes by Constance Urdang; & War Babies by Frederick Busch)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Panties

Pastoral

Easter Dresses

Kent Meyers has published a memoir, a book of short fiction, and three novels, two of which have been listed as New York Times Notable Books. (The most recent is Twisted Tree, released in 2009). His work has won numerous honors, including a Society of Midland Authors Award and a High Plains Book Award. Meyers has published fiction and essays in various literary journals and magazines, including Harper’s and (several times) The Georgia Review. He lives in Spearfish, South Dakota, and teaches in Pacific Lutheran University’s low-residency MFA program, the Rainier Writing Workshop.

The Great Depression

Hunt Hawkins’ poems have appeared in Poetry, Southern Review, TriQuarterly, Beloit Poetry Journal, Poetry Northwest, The Georgia Review, and many other journals. His poetry collection, The Domestic Life (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1994), won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. He is chair of the English department at the University of South Florida.

Naming the Stone