on Potted Meat by Steven Dunn

Steven Dunn’s novel Potted Meat begins with an unconventional table of contents under the guise of an ingredients list and instructions for consumption. This maneuver automatically subverts readers’ expectations of convention and brings to the forefront the idea of control. …

Katie Jean Shinkle is the author of the novels The Arson People (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2015) and Our Prayers After the Fire (Blue Square Press, 2014). Other work appears in Ninth Letter, Washington Square Review, Flaunt Magazine, Barrow Street, and elsewhere. She serves as the fiction co-editor of DIAGRAM.

on My Father & Atticus Finch: A Lawyer’s Fight for Justice in 1930s Alabama by Joseph Madison Beck

Gary Kerley is a retired educator living in Bermuda Run, North Carolina. His reviews and articles have appeared in a number of publications and encyclopedias. An essay on the relationship between James Dickey and Pat Conroy and a review of Henry Taylor’s selected poems, This Tilted World Is Where I Live, will appear in the 2020 issue of The James Dickey Review. His articles on Alice Friman and William Walsh will appear next year on the online New Georgia Encyclopedia.

on Among the Gorgons by Michelle Boisseau

Alice Friman’s poetry collections include Blood Weather (LSU Press, 2019), The View from Saturn (LSU Press, 2014), Vinculum (LSU Press, 2011), The Book of the Rotten Daughter (BkMk Press, 2006), Zoo (1999), Inverted Fire (1997), and Reporting from Corinth (1984). A recipient of many honors, including two Pushcart Prizes and inclusion in Best American Poetry, she has been published in Poetry, Ploughshares, The Georgia Review, Gettysburg Review, Plume, Crazyhorse, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was Poet-in-Residence at Georgia College. 

on IRL by Tommy Pico

The text message that begins Tommy Pico’s 98-page-long poem is addressed to potential lover “Girard,” but I like to think of it as an invitation to the reader as well:

. . . do

u wanna come

over? Watch me

Mary-Kim Arnold is the author of Litany for the Long Moment (Essay Press, 2018) and the forthcoming The Fish & The Dove (Noemi Press, 2020). Awarded fellowships from the Rhode Island Foundation and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, she holds an MFA from Brown University and now teaches there in the Nonfiction Writing Program.

Displaced Familiarity: Voice, Then Meaning, in Contemporary Poetry (on Kathryn Nuernberger’s The End of Pink; Joshua Bennett’s The Sobbing School; James McMichael’s If You Can Tell; and Larry Levis’ The Darkening Trapeze: Last Poems)

Kevin Clark’s several books of poems include the forthcoming The Consecrations (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2021). His first collection, In the Evening of No Warning (New Issues Poetry and Prose, 2002), earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets, and his second, Self-Portrait with Expletives (2010), won the Pleiades Press prize. His poetry appears in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, and Crazyhorse. A regular critic for The Georgia Review, he’s also published essays in the Southern Review, Papers on Language and Literature, and Contemporary Literary Criticism. He teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop. 

from Geometric Series

 

“My subject is, in a sense, ‘formlessness,’ ” explains Erin McIntosh in a statement for New American Paintings, but the artist’s obsession appears to be with color.

McIntosh, whose improvisational approach to palette combines chromatic neutrals with variations …

An assistant professor of art at North Georgia University, Erin McIntosh is represented by Gregg Irby Gallery in Atlanta. Her work has appeared in numerous solo and group exhibitions and was reproduced in New American Paintings. She earned both her BFA and her MFA from the University of Georgia.

Women Are Doomed to Be the Angels of Love

This is so true I involuntarily doodle hearts everywhere I go. I sign my letters compulsively with hearts,

dream of disobedient hearts, work with hearts. I eat them. I boil sauces and the tomatoes on my cutting board form a …

Nikki Wallschlaeger’s work has been featured in The Nation, Brick, American Poetry Review, Witness, Kenyon Review, Poetry, and others. She is the author of the full-length collections Houses (Horseless Press, 2015) and Crawlspace (Bloof Books, 2017) as well as the graphic book I Hate Telling You How I Really Feel (Bloof Books, 2019). She is also the author of an artist book called “Operation USA” through the Baltimore-based book arts group Container, a project acquired by Woodland Pattern Book Center in Milwaukee. Her third collection, Waterbaby, is forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press in 2021.

Late Spring

 

is the most important. Everything else is just an excuse for it.

E.g. weather in medium shot that you take extremely

seriously. Cloud above German city, white, covering

the blue, dispersing into formlessness, gossamer

and dissipating like ancient knowledge.

Primož Čučnik, poet and translator, was born in Ljubljana in 1971. His first collection of poetry, Dve Zimi (Two Winters), was published in 1999 and received the Slovenian Book Fair First Book Award. His other books include Trilogija (LUD Literatura, 2015), Mikado (Študentska založba, 2012), Kot dar (2010), Delo in dom (2007), Nova okna (2005), and a collaboration with Gregor Podlogar and Žiga Kariž, Oda na manhatnski aveniji (2004). Čučnik translates contemporary Polish and American poetry, works as an editor of the magazine Literatura, and runs the small press Šerpa.

Anonymous

John Poch teaches in the creative writing program at Texas Tech University. His most recent book, Fix Quiet, won the 2014 New Criterion Poetry Prize.