The Cartographer Gets Lost; Self-Portrait as Alone with Thoughts; & Pisces

­Erin Adair-Hodges is the winner of the 2016 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize for her first poetry collection, Let’s All Die Happy (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017). Adair-Hodges earned an MFA from the University of Arizona and then quit writing poetry; eight years later, her first accepted poem won The Georgia Review’s 2014 Loraine Williams Poetry Prize. Since then, her work has been published in Boulevard, Crazyhorse, Green Mountains Review, Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner, Radar and more. Adair-Hodges is currently the visiting assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Toledo.

I Want Back Everything I’ve Laid on the Altar & When Lightning Split the Plum Tree

Kaveh Akbar is the founding editor of Divedapper. His poems have appeared recently in the New YorkerPoetryThe NationPloughshares, and elsewhere. His first book, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, is just out with Alice James in the U.S. and Penguin Books in the UK.

Desert Storm & Bear Man Martin Spills the Beans

R. T. Smith is writer-in-residence at Washington and Lee University, where he edits Shenandoah. The latest of his many books are Outlaw Style: Poems (University of Arkansas Press, 2007) and a collection of stories, The Calaboose Epistles (Iris Press, 2009). His work has been reprinted in such notable anthologies as Best American Poetry, Best American Short Stories, and the Pushcart Prize.

The Border Guard

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press. 

Brink

Cathy Smith Bowers’ collections of poetry include Like Shining from Shook Foil (2010), The Candle I Hold Up to See You (2009), and A Book of Minutes (2004), and her poems have appeared in publications such as Poetry, the Southern Review, Kenyon Review, and Ploughshares. For many years the poet-in-residence at Queens University of Charlotte, Bowers currently teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Queens and in the Haden Institute Spiritual Direction and Dream Leadership programs. From 2010 to 2012, she was poet laureate of North Carolina.

The Major Holidays

Lee Upton’s most recent book of poetry is Bottle the Bottles the Bottles the Bottles (Cleveland State University Poetry Center, 2015); her new collection of fiction is Vis-itations: Stories (LSU Press, 2017).

Making the most of the least I can do

for & from James Galvin

 

People were nice. I asked the priest

to wear my mother’s wedding dress during the sermon

about the difference between turning the other cheek

and looking the other way. The cowboy

wore it gelding

Bob Hicok’s ninth book, Hold, is just out from Copper Canyon Press.

Children’s Fall

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Invisible Star Maps

For my stepdaughter Kari Harvey (23 December 1982–10 May 2016)

We know that we have passed out of death into life.

—1 John 3:14

Wherever we go we leave a thumbprint of the soul.

Ghosts of words we never said

Richard Jackson has published fifteen books of poems and is the author or editor of multiple critical monographs, books in translation, and anthologies. His most recent books are Broken Horizons (Press 53, 2018) and Out of Place (Ashland Poetry Press, 2014); “Take Five,” a prose poetry project with four other poets, is forthcoming.