Darwin and Dickinson among the Heliotropes

Anne Goldman’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the Guardian, The Georgia Review, the Gettysburg Review, and the Southwest Review, among other venues. Her essays have been named as notable in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature Writing, and the Best American Travel Writing. Nominated for a National Magazine Award, she is the recipient of fellowships from the Ahmanson/Getty Foundation and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Goldman is Professor of English at Sonoma State University. She is at work upon a second nonfiction manuscript, “An Aria for Insects and Other Essays.”

Coal, Natural Gas, “Other Material,” and Whiskey: Hydrofracturing Country, USA

Jason Molesky is a doctoral student in American literature at Princeton University. He earned his MFA at the University of Mississippi, where he was a John and Renee Grisham Fellow in creative writing. He has worked as a coal miner, a forklift operator, a security contractor, and a brain injury outreach coordinator, and has been a resident fellow at the Blue Mountain Center. Molesky lives with his partner in Lawrenceville, NJ.

Commensals: Theme and Variations

Humans, who make up .01 percent of the biomass of the earth, have destroyed 83 percent of the wild mammals in it, and half of all the plants.

—Yinon M. Bar-On, Rob Phillips, and Ron Milo, “The Biomass Distribution on …

Susanne Paola Antonetta’s Make Me a Mother, ranked a Top Ten Book of the Year by Image Journal, was published by W. W. Norton (2014). She is also the author of Curious Atoms: A History with Physics (Essay Press, 2016), and five poetry collections, most recently Stolen Moments (Shebooks, 2013). Her works have been New York Times Notable Books and an Oprah Bookshelf pick, and she has earned honors that include an American Book Award and a Pushcart Prize. She lives in Bellingham, Washington, and is the editor-in-chief of the Bellingham Review.

The Carcass Chronicle

We found the elk’s carcass in the morning, just downhill from the pasture fence where she lay sprawled across an iced-over stream. Carcass is a harsh word for that once-graceful animal, a cow elk whose small head and hooves made …

Robin Patten writes about the natural world and the relationships between people and place, where nature and culture meet. She is a contributor to the Guardian’s Country Diary column, and her work has appeared in Camas: The Nature of the West, Montana Outdoors, and The Mindful Word.

Is All Writing Environmental Writing?

We are in the midst of the planet’s sixth great extinction, in a time where we are seeing the direct effects of radical global climate change via more frequent and ferocious storms, hotter drier years accompanied by more devastating wildfires, …

Camille T. Dungy is the author of the essay collection Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History (W. W. Norton, 2017), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and four collections of poetry, most recently Trophic Cascade (Wesleyan University Press, 2017), winner of the Colorado Book Award. She has also edited several anthologies, including Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry (University of Georgia Press, 2009). Her honors include NEA Fellowships in both poetry (2003) and prose (2018), an American Book Award, and two NAACP Image Award nominations. She is a professor at Colorado State University.