Exile of Memory

Joy Harjo, born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, whose original homelands spanned the entire region known today as the southeastern United States. Harjo’s poetry inhabits landscapes of the Southwest and Southeast, but also Alaska and Hawaii—and centers on the need for remembrance and transcendence. Her work is often autobiographical, informed by the natural world, and above, all preoccupied with survival and the limitations of language. She was named the United States poet laureate in June 2019.

The Treaty of New Echota: The Beloved Path Narrows

Daniel Heath Justice is a Colorado-born Canadian citizen of the Cherokee Nation and currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture at University of British Columbia, which is on unceded Musqueam territory. He is author of Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (Wilford Laurier University Press, 2018), Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (University of Minnesota Press, 2006), and numerous essays and reviews in the field of Indigenous literary studies. He has also co-edited a number of critical and creative anthologies and journals, including the award-winning Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature (2014) and Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature (University of Arizona Press, 2011).

Notes from Coosa

Jennifer Elise Foerster is the author of two books of poetry, Bright Raft in the Afterweather (2018) and Leaving Tulsa (2013), both from University of Arizona Press. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford, she received her PhD in English and Literary Arts from the University of Denver and has been the recipient of a 2017 NEA Creative Writing Fellowship and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship. A member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, she lives in San Francisco.

Don de Soto, Un-Redacted, As Told by the Lady of Cofitachequi

LeAnne Howe is an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. The Eidson Distinguished Professor of American Literature in English at the University of Georgia, her awards include the American Book Award, Western Literature Association’s Distinguished Achievement Award, the inaugural 2014 MLA Prize for Studies in Native American Literatures, and a United States Artists Ford Fellowship, among others. Her most recent book, Savage Conversations (Coffee House Press, 2019), tells the story of Mary Todd Lincoln and the “Savage Indian” spirit she said tortured her nightly.

Nathan Dixon is pursuing a PhD in English literature and creative writing at the University of Georgia. His creative work has appeared in Tin House, the North Carolina Literary Review, the Northern Virginia Review, the Penn Review, and NAILED, among others. His one-act play “Thoughts & Prayers Inc.” was recently chosen by National Book Award winner Nikky Finney as the forty-eighth annual winner of the Agnes Scott College Prize. His scholarly work has twice appeared in Renaissance Papers, where he previously served as assistant editor. He co-curates the YumFactory reading series in Athens, Georgia.

What Makes the Red Man Red? Answer: The U.S. Census

Nathan Dixon is pursuing a PhD in English literature and creative writing at the University of Georgia. His creative work has appeared in Tin House, the North Carolina Literary Review, the Northern Virginia Review, the Penn Review, and NAILED, among others. His one-act play “Thoughts & Prayers Inc.” was recently chosen by National Book Award winner Nikky Finney as the forty-eighth annual winner of the Agnes Scott College Prize. His scholarly work has twice appeared in Renaissance Papers, where he previously served as assistant editor. He co-curates the YumFactory reading series in Athens, Georgia.

Matt Kliewer is a PhD student at the University of Georgia specializing in Indigenous literatures and film. He holds a master’s degree from the University of Oklahoma and is currently the poetry reviews editor at Transmotion.

Disneyland, Not

Janet McAdams is Robert P. Hubbard Professor of Poetry at Kenyon College. Her books include Red Weather (University of Arizona Press, 2012); Feral (Salt Publishing, 2007); The Island of Lost Luggage (University of Arizona Press, 2000), which won an American Book Award; and a chapbook of prose poems, Seven Boxes for the Country After. With Geary Hobson and Kathryn Walkiewicz, she edited the anthology The People Who Stayed: Southern Indian Writing after Removal (University of Oklahoma Press, 2010).

Bruegel: Census and Massacre

Martin Harries is a professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, and the author of Forgetting Lot’s Wife: On Destructive Spectatorship (Fordham University Press, 2007) and Scare Quotes from Shakespeare: Marx, Keynes, and the Language of Reenchantment (Stanford University Press, 2000). His current book project, “Theater after Film,” investigates the impact of mass culture on forms of drama after World War II.

The Lives beneath the Counting

I had found the perfect way to stop grinding my teeth and tearing my hair out over my client’s recalcitrance toward the fourteen calls I had made to her in two weeks. She had still not brought me the document …

Sujata Gupta Winfield practiced employment-discrimination law for many years, advocating for employees, and is now an immigration lawyer who lives and runs a solo firm in Athens, Georgia. Having left Calcutta, India, she is attuned to her clients’ poverty, sorrow at leaving behind home and family, feelings of alienation, experiences of disadvantage in a new land, and striving to make their sacrifices work. “The Lives beneath the Counting” is her first published piece.

A Distant Goal We Seek

In the isolated rural South, the arrival of a stranger often elicits both fear and excitement. That is why, nearly fifty years later, I remember so clearly the day an unknown woman in a sensible shirtwaist dress drove down our …

W. Ralph Eubanks is the author of A Place Like Mississippi (forthcoming 2021 from Timber Press), The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South (HarperCollins, 2009), and Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey into Mississippi’s Dark Past (Basic Books, 2003). His essays have been published in The Hedgehog Review, The American Scholar, and The New Yorker. A 2007 Guggenheim Fellow, he is currently a visiting professor of English and Southern studies at the University of Mississippi. He divides his time between Oxford, Mississippi, and Washington, D.C.