Robinson Jeffers Redivivus

William H. Nolte (1928–1999), professor of English at the University of South Carolina from 1967 to 1990, was the author of Rock and Hawk: Robinson Jeffers and the Romantic Agony (1978) and H. L. Mencken, Literary Critic (1966). His essay, which originally appeared in the Summer 1978 Georgia Review, is reprinted here by permission of his daughter, Katherine Ann Nolte.

Blossom

Stanley Plumly (1939–2019) authored ten collections of poems and four works of nonfiction. Elegy Landscape: Constable and Turner and the Intimate Sublime, his most recent book, was published by W. W. Norton in 2018. His many honors and awards include an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Truman Capote Award, and the Paterson Poetry Prize. He was the founding director of the MFA program in creative writing at the University of Maryland, where he had been a professor of English since 1985. Middle Distance, a collection of poems he finished before his death, will be published by W. W. Norton in 2020.

Singing Birds, Noiseless Trees

Old Folks Home

Shamanism Toward Confessionalism: James Dickey, Poet

Carrier

“Moonlight dries no mittens”: Carl Sandburg Reconsidered

Daniel Hoffman, a former Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (1973–74), will publish his thirteenth book of verse, Next to Last Words, in April 2013, on the occasion of his ninetieth birthday.

An Ode

Mimosa

Cleopatra Mathis, author of seven books of poems, has seen her work appear widely in anthologies, magazines, and journals, including the New Yorker, Poetry, Best American Poetry, TriQuarterly, The Made Thing: An Anthology of Contemporary Southern Poetry, and The Extraordinary Tide: Poetry by American Women. She has been the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants, the Jane Kenyon Award, the Peter I. B. Lavan Younger Poets Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and the Robert Frost Award.