Ach! The Shadow of the Spinster and Vestige

Sarah Gordon is the author of A Literary Guide to Flannery O’Connor’s Georgia (2008) and Flannery O’Connor: The Obedient Imagination (2000), both from the University of Georgia Press. Her poetry has recently appeared in Sewanee Review, Shenandoah, Southeast Review, Southern Poetry Review, and Arts & Letters.

Indolence & Lovely

Robert Wrigley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho, lives in the high-mountain woods near Moscow. His eleventh and most recent book of poems is Box (Penguin, 2017).

Good-bye to Golden Nights

 

If measuring

one’s life as circular

makes sense of movement,

how should we muscle

meaning into days?

As if we end up

where we’ve dreamt,

starlight for eyes

and train static

within the folds

of memory. One story

arrives

Adam Clay’s most recent collection is Stranger (Milkweed Editions, 2016). His poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Boston Review, Iowa Review, and elsewhere. A co-editor of TYPO Magazine, he serves as a book review editor for Kenyon Review and teaches at the University of Illinois Springfield.

Earful

George David Clark’s first book, Reveille (Arkansas, 2015), won the Miller Williams Prize, and his more recent work can be found in AGNI, the Gettysburg Review, Image, the New Criterion, Poetry Northwest, the Southern Review, and elsewhere. He edits the journal 32 Poems and teaches creative writing at Washington & Jefferson College.

Wish You Were Here

Phillip Sterling’s most recent books are the poetry collection And Then Snow (Main Street Rag) and, as editor, Isle Royale from the AIR: Poems, Stories, and Songs from 25 Years of Artists-in-Residence (Caffeinated Press), both released in 2017. He has served as artist-in-residence for both Isle Royale National Park and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

Hit It

 

You don’t have to believe in the Devil

to end up with him. God’s not so easy.

 

Say God takes the form of an egret.

Say the Devil also takes the form of an egret.

 

Both have

Karyna McGlynn is the author of Hothouse (2017) and I Have to Go Back to 1994 and Kill a Girl (2009)—both from Sarabande Books—and several chapbooks. Her poems have recently appeared in the Kenyon ReviewBlack Warrior Review, Ninth Letter, Witness, and elsewhere. McGlynn earned her PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Houston, where she served as managing editor for Gulf Coast. Her honors include the Verlaine Prize, the Kathryn A. Morton Prize, the Hopwood Award, and the Diane Middlebrook Fellowship in Poetry at the University of Wisconsin. She is currently a visiting assistant professor at Oberlin College.

The Trouble with Ceremony

 

My grenadier, Specialist Taylor, did not attend our welcome home ceremony at the Marriott Hotel and Convention Center in Coralville, Iowa, because in the hour preceding the event, as we waited outside the hotel and as our families gathered …

Steven Moore received an MFA in nonfiction from Oregon State University and lives with his wife in the western part of the state. His essays have recently appeared in Ninth Letter and BOAAT, among others.

All Lines of Order

The Boquillas Trail is located in a remote corner of Big Bend National Park in Texas. It begins with several long steps sloping gently upward, followed by a number of shorter, steeper steps which veer out of sight to the …

Andrew Menard is the author of Learning from Thoreau (University of Georgia Press, 2018) and Sight Unseen: How Frémont’s First Expedition Changed the American Landscape (Bison Books, 2012). His most recent essays and articles have appeared in Antioch ReviewThe Georgia ReviewHinterlandJournal of American StudiesOxford Art Journal, and the New England Quarterly. 

Hell and Reason

In February 1943, as a boy just shy of his eighteenth birthday, Charles Fisk wrote home to his parents in Massachusetts: “The work I am doing means nothing to me. That is, I don’t understand what the object of it …

Laura Sewell Matter is an essayist and teacher who lives in New Mexico. Her work has been anthologized in Best Creative Nonfiction and published in various literary journals, including The Georgia Review.