The Mole

Jim Peterson is the author of five poetry collections, three chapbooks, and a novel; his newest collection, Original Face, was released by Gunpowder Press in October 2015. Peterson’s poems have appeared widely in such journals as Poetry, Shenandoah, Poetry Northwest, Prairie Schooner, South Dakota Review, and Cave Wall. He lives with his charismatic corgi, Mama Kilya, in Lynchburg, Virginia.

Riddle

 

We do not recognize the body

Of Emmett Till. We do not know

The boy’s name nor the sound

Of his mother wailing. We have

Never heard a mother wailing. 

We do not know the history

Of ourselves in

Jericho Brown is the recipient of a Whiting Writers Award and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the National Endowment for the Arts. His poems have appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, and Best American Poetry, among others. His first book, Please (New Issues, 2008), won the American Book Award, and his second, The New Testament (Copper Canyon Press, 2014), won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and the Thom Gunn Award, and was named one of the best books of the year by Library Journal, Coldfront, and the Academy of American Poets. He is an associate professor in English and creative writing at Emory University in Atlanta.

Let’s Say

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

Valley of Knowledge

 

Enter the Valley of Knowledge,

with its boundless myriad roads

unfurling in every direction.

 

Here, no path resembles the next.

Here, the traveler of the body is different

from the traveler of the soul.

Here, both body and

Attar (CE 1145–1221) was born in Nishapur, a city in the northeast region of Iran. Considered by Rumi to be “the master” of Sufi mystic poetry, Attar is best known for his epic poem The Conference of the Birds, an allegorical tale about the soul’s search for meaning. “Valley of Knowledge”—translated in this issue by Sholeh Wolpé—is one of the seven valleys the birds must pass in order to reach the court of their king, Simurgh. Wolpé’s full translation of The Conference of the Birds is forthcoming from W. W. Norton & Co in March 2017. 

Portrait of Poet in Stroller and Awe; From the Book of Accounts; & High Country, First Night

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

On Mother’s Suicide

Mary B. Moore has poems forthcoming in Poem/Memoir/Story, Unsplendid, Atlanta Review, and the anthology Eyes Glowing at the Edge of the Woods: Fiction and Poetry from West Virginia (West Virginia University Press). Her full-length collections are The Book of Snow (1998) and Flicker (2016)the latter the winner of the Dogfish Head Poetry Award.  

A Brutal Faith

Gerard Beirne has published six books of fiction and poetry. He has been shortlisted three times for awards in fiction: this year for the BGE Irish Book Awards Short Story of the Year Award; in 2015 for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award for his collection of stories In a Time of Drought and Hunger (Oberon Press, 2014); and in 2004 for the Kerry Group Irish Fiction Award for his 2003 novel The Eskimo in the Net. 

Wig Violence

As of yesterday, there is a woman on the run: Eudoxie Gilmore, 32, a lifetime resident of Cape Jasmine who up until recently had worked at the Peoples Funeral Home as hairdresser to the deceased. Eudoxie specialized in finger waves, …

Selena Anderson’s stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, Kenyon Review, Joyland, AGNI, and Best of Gigantic. Originally from Pearland, Texas, Anderson completed her MFA at Columbia University, where she won the 2007 Transatlantic/Henfield Prize. She is working on a collection of stories. 

Linguistic Fallacies and Facial Tics, Sex Ed and Death

A month after my parents rightly feared unlawful and inferable retribution—maybe twenty-seven days after my Uncle Cush arrived, insisting that we move to his abode on the other side of the Savannah River nuclear facility, for he foresaw arson, which …

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.