Days of Disorder

Jerry McGahan (1943–2016), beekeeper and much else, was the author of the story collection The Deer Walking Upside Down (Schaffner Press, 2015) and the novel A Condor Brings the Sun (1996). His stories and essays were published by the Iowa Review, the Antioch Review, the Gettysburg Review, Ploughshares, and other literary journals. McGahan passed away with his wife, Janet, by his side in Arlee, Montana, on the land he had loved for almost fifty years.

Still Lifes and Landscapes

 

Morning in the mountains. I am going down home

early. The road empty, wide, smooth as my hand.

Sun streams heavy bays of light. If I could remember one

use of beauty, the persistent type, on whole unhuman,

so

Emily Wolahan is the author of Hinge (The National Poetry Review Press, 2015). Her poems have appeared in Gulf Coast, Boston Review, Volt, Fourteen Hills, and others, and her essays have been published in the New Inquiry and anthologized in Among Margins: Critical and Lyrical Writing on Aesthetics. She is associate editor at Two Lines Press and a founding editor at JERRY Magazine. She lives in San Francisco, where she is a member of the San Francisco Writer’s Grotto.

A Late Interview with Judith Ortiz Cofer

Judith Ortiz Cofer (1952–2016) spoke at length with Alan Flurry, UGA’s Franklin College of Arts & Sciences Director of Communications, in December 2013. Here, for the first time, is the full transcript of their conversation, published in honor of Judith …

Alan Flurry is an Athens, Georgia-based writer, filmmaker, and television host. More about his work is available at alanflurry.com

 

Back and Forth with Kaveh Akbar

Thibault Raoult (TR): Such robust and odd images in “Portrait of the Alcoholic with Shattered Pelvis.” Did these all originally belong to this poem? Might you have a daybook of images? Do images happen to you? Or do you seek …

Thibault Raoult was an assistant editor at The Georgia Review from 2015 to 2017. He now teaches at University of Maryland. Raoult holds a PhD from University of Georgia and an MFA in Literary Arts from Brown University; he has published two books of poems—Person Hour (2011) and Disposable Epics (2014)—and the cross-genre text «Pro(m)bois(e)» (2016).

Talking Fiction with Venita Blackburn, 2016 Pushcart Prize Nominee

Bridget Dooley (BD): First of all, thanks so much for allowing me to ask you questions! I was struck by your story in our Summer 2016 issue, “Ravished,” particularly in how humor creates intimacy and in how complicated the sisters’ …

Bridget Dooley is a PhD student in creative writing and literature at the University of Georgia and a graduate of Western Michigan University’s MFA in fiction. Her writing has appeared in Word Riot, Apt, The Electronic Encyclopedia of Experimental Literature, Goddessmode: a collection of video game writing by women and nonbinary artists, and is forthcoming from Cream City Review and The Atlas Review. You can find her work at bgd.neocities.org

on The Other One by Hasanthika Sirisena

Sarah Blakley-Cartwright is the New York Times bestselling author of Red Riding Hood (Poppy, 2011). The recipient of awards from the Aspen Writers Institute and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, she lives in New York City.

on The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes

Julian Barnes’s 1989 novel A History of the World in 10½ Chapters includes an essayistic meditation on love in which he brilliantly considers the meanings and ramifications of history and our tendency to turn life into a narrative:

The

Jonathan Russell Clark is a literary critic and the author of the forthcoming Skateboard (Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2022) as well as An Oasis of Horror in a Desert of Boredom (Fiction Advocate, 2018). His writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, Tin House, Vulture, Rolling Stone, the Atlantic, and numerous others.

(In)justice of the Place: Design and Pattern in Contemporary Political Poetry

Recent racial violence in the United States and abroad makes poetry books that take up social justice ever more urgent. Books with explicit political content often eschew the lyrical in favor of “documentary” materials, while others manage to twine them. …

Robin Becker’s new book of poems, The Black Bear Inside Me (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018), appears in the Pitt Poetry Series. Her previous books with Pitt include Tiger Heron (2014), Domain of Perfect Affection (2006), All-American Girl (1996), The Horse Fair (2000), and Giacometti’s Dog (1990). Recent poems have appeared in the New York Times Magazine and the New Yorker. The Liberal Arts Research Professor Emeritus of English and Women’s Studies at Penn State, Becker serves as contributing and poetry editor for the Women’s Review of Books.

Feasting on Surprise, Caught Fast in Pictures (on Rachael Z. DeLue’s Arthur Dove: Always Connect; Robert Walser’s Looking at Pictures, translated by Susan Bernofsky, Lydia Davis, and Christopher Middleton; and Julian Barnes’s Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art)

Luke A. Fidler is a doctoral student in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago. His scholarly work has appeared in, or is forthcoming from, Art Journal, Peregrinations, and postmedieval.