Translating the Word for Home

 

A small city disappears in

the near-sighted dusk of a coastal winter.

Someone is walking home as I once did.

Someone is thinking as I did once

this is their neighborhood, their consolation.

Once I thought words could describe

Eavan Boland (1944–2020) authored many books over her distinguished career, including, most recently, A Poet’s Dublin (2016) and A Woman Without a Country (2014). Other poetry volumes include Domestic Violence (2007); Against Love Poetry (2001); The Lost Land (1998); and In a Time of Violence (1994). Boland also published two books of prose: A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet (2011) and Object Lessons: The Life of the Woman and the Poet in Our Time (1995); she also co-edited with Mark Strand and Edward Hirsch the Norton anthologies The Making of a Sonnet (2007) and The Making of a Poem (2000). Her numerous honors include a Lannan Foundation Award in poetry and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as the Royal Irish Academy. Boland directed the creative-writing program at Stanford University. 

Dickinson in Aleppo

Reginald Gibbons has published ten books of poems, most recently Last Lake (University of Chicago Press, 2016); his Creatures of a Day (LSU Press, 2008) was a finalist for the National Book Award. His translations (with Charles Segal) include Sophocles’ Antigone (2003) and Euripides’ Bakkhai (2001), as well as works by poets from Mexico, Spain, and elsewhere. His most recent fiction is An Orchard in the Street (BOA Editions, 2017), and he has also published the critical study How Poems Think (Chicago, 2015).Gibbons is a Frances Hooper Professor of Arts and Humanities at Northwestern University, where he is the director of the new Litowitz MFA+MA Graduate Creative Writing Program. 

Callie Barr’s Black Bottom

 

In memory of Callie Barr, known in historical record 

as caretaker of William Faulkner’s family

 

 

You may find her behind

          Rowan Oak, a shadow

               of fortress where then now

          you find no real entry place.

Where then

Malcolm Tariq is a poet and playwright from Savannah, Georgia. He is the author of Heed the Hollow (Graywolf Press, 2019), winner of the 2018 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, and Extended Play (Gertrude Press, 2017), winner of the 2017 Gertrude Press Poetry Chapbook Contest. A graduate of Emory University, Tariq has a PhD in English from the University of Michigan and has received fellowships from Cave Canem and The Watering Hole. He lives in New York City.

History

Brian Swann’s most recent collections are Another Log on the Fire: New and Selected Fiction (MadHat Press, 2019) and Sunday Out of Nowhere: New and Selected Poems (Sheep Meadow Press, 2018). 

“Shadows in the Story”: An Interview with Eavan Boland

INTRODUCTION

For a number of years I have taught a course in Irish Literature and Culture at my home institution, Reinhardt University, and among the standard author readings I petition of my students are William Butler Yeats, Oscar Wilde, James …

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.

The Name Means Thunder

I am no longer blind, but there was a time many years ago when I lost my vision. Next week I’ll see the eye doctor for my cataracts, and he’ll ask if my eyes were ever damaged. I don’t know …

Morgan Talty was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and grew up on the Penobscot Indian Nation in Maine. He received his B.A. in Native American studies from Dartmouth College and completed an MFA in the Stonecoast program at the University of Southern Maine. Talty’s work has appeared in or is forthcoming from Shenandoah, Narrative, TriQuarterly, LitHub, and elsewhere. He lives in Levant, Maine.

Gracie and Devere

Jack Driscoll’s latest collection, The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot (Wayne State University Press, 2017), received the 2018 Michigan Library Foundation Award for fiction. His forthcoming “New & Selected” will include eleven stories previously published in The Georgia Review and dating back to 1987. He currently teaches in Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program in Oregon.

On the Farm

Anne Wright was born in New York City and grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut. After graduating from Wheelock College in 1950 she taught for forty-two years, working with students from nursery school up to a program for young adults. She met and married James Wright in 1967 in New York City, which became their home. After James’s death in 1980, she edited the following of his books: This Journey (Vintage, 1982); Collected Prose (University of Michigan Press, 1983); The Secret Field: Selections from the Final Journals of James Wright (Logbridge-Rhodes, 1985); Above the River: The Complete Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1992); and The Delicacy and Strength of Lace: Letters Between Leslie Marmon Silko and James Wright (Graywolf, 2009). The couple collaborated on a book of prose pieces, The Summers of Annie and James Wright: Sketches and Mosaics (Sheep Meadow, 1981); and Anne co-edited with Saundra Rose Maley A Wild Perfection: The Selected Letters of James Wright (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005).

Back Roads and Ditch-Wise: Against Ben Lerner’s The Hatred of Poetry

Molly Spencer’s recent poetry and critical writings have appeared or are forthcoming in Blackbird, FIELD, New England Review, Prairie Schooner, Colorado Review, and Tupelo Quarterly. Her debut poetry collection, If the House (University of Wisconsin Press, 2019), won the Brittingham Prize; a second collection, Relic and the Plum, won the 2019 Crab Orchard Open Competition and is forthcoming from Southern Illinois University Press in fall 2020. Spencer is a poetry editor for The Rumpus and teaches at the University of Michigan.