On Slaughter and Praying: An Essay in Two Parts

Part One. Before Getting to My Desk 

Before getting to my desk this morning I’ve woken to the back of Luke’s spine in blue light and understood for the first time that is the image I have been dreaming of …

Carol Ann Davis is the author of the poetry collections Psalm (2007) and Atlas Hour (2011), both from Tupelo Press. An NEA Fellow in poetry and a finalist for the National Magazine Award for work in our pages, she has an essay collection (The Nail in the Tree: Essays on Art, Violence, and Parenting) coming out in 2019, also from Tupelo. A professor of English at Fairfield University, Davis lives in Newtown, Connecticut, with her husband and two sons. 

Re-Materialization, Remoteness, and Reverence: A Critique of De-Materialization in Art

Genese Grill holds a BFA from Cooper Union in painting, and an MA and PhD from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in Germanic literatures and languages. She is the author of The World as Metaphor in Robert Musil’s “The Man without Qualities”: Possibility as Reality (Camden House, 2012) and the translator of a collection of Musil’s short prose, Thought Flights (2015); his short-story collection Unions (2019); and Theater Symptoms: Robert Musil’s Plays and Writings on Theater (forthcoming)—with these three all from Contra Mundum. Her literary essays, translator introductions, and scholarly writing have appeared in The Georgia Review, Numero Cinq (where she is on the masthead as special correspondent), Hyperion: On the Future of Aesthetics, the Missouri Review, and elsewhere. Her completed, as-yet-unpublished collection of essays celebrates the relationship between matter and spirit.

The Slow and Tender Death of Cockroaches

In my beginning is my end.

—T. S. Eliot, “East Coker”

 

I always find them alone. Laid on their backs and clawing at the ceiling, like they were still falling from a too-high place. I find them on the …

Sean P. Smith grew up in Montana and has lived and taught in the Middle East and South Africa. He currently resides in Hong Kong.

Cocktails with Vultures, or, A General Theory of Boredom

David Gessner’s Ultimate Glory, his memoir of his years playing Ultimate Frisbee, is due out in June 2017 from Riverhead Books. He is the author of All the Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West (W. W. Norton, 2015), as well as eight other books—among them The Tarball Chronicles (2011), My Green Manifesto (2011), and Sick of Nature (2003). Founder of Ecotone, the literary journal of place, Gessner served as host of the National Geographic Explorer television show, Call of the Wild, which explored how our constant use of screens is damaging our brains and how nature can be restorative.

On Becoming an American Writer

James Alan McPherson (1943–2016), a native of Savannah, Georgia, was recently selected for induction into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame. He won the 1978 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with his second short-story collection, Elbow Room, and in 1981 he was in the inaugural group of MacArthur Fellowship recipients. The American Academy of Arts and Sciences added McPherson to its membership in 1995, and in 2000 his “Gold Coast” was included by editor John Updike in Houghton Mifflin’s Best Short Stories of the Century. McPherson was educated at Morgan State University, Morris Brown College, and Harvard Law School—after which he decided to get an MFA in creative writing from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (1971). Elbow Room was preceded by the fiction collection Hue and Cry (1969) and followed by two nonfiction works, Crabcakes: A Memoir (1998) and A Region Not Home: Reflections on Exile (2000). Beginning in 1969, McPherson taught briefly at the University of California–Santa Cruz, Harvard, Morgan State, and the University of Virginia; he returned to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop as a faculty member in 1981, and he was associated with that program for the rest of his life.

KAWA=FLOW

Over the past three decades, Japanese photographer Masao Yamamoto has produced a deeply cohesive oeuvre of highly autonomous, stand-alone images. The same could be said of other masters of the medium, but in Yamamoto’s work the tension between the artist’s …

Masao Yamamoto’s work is exhibited and included in many public and private collections nationally and internationally including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; The International Center of Photography, New York, NY; and the Sir Elton John Collection. Recent solo exhibitions include Small Things in Silence at Espacio Foto in Madrid and KAWA=FLOW at Jackson Fine Art in Atlanta.

The Uncanny Mr. Logan (on Only the Dreamer Can Change the Dream: Selected Poems 1953-1973 by John Logan & The Bridge of Change by John Logan)

Prize-Winning Novels and the Contemporary Fictional Voice (on After Freud by Mary Elsie Robertson; & Kingdoms by Barry Targan)

At the Beginning and the End of the Earth (on Basin and Range by John McPhee; Sand Rivers by Peter Matthiessen, Hugo van Lawick)

Samuel Pickering, the author of more thirty books, which span several genres, was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. He taught English for forty-five years, thirty-five of them at the University of Connecticut. His most recent book is Parade’s End, published by Mercer University Press in 2018. “Reading Pickering,” a reviewer wrote in the Smithsonian decades ago, “is like taking a walk with your oldest, wittiest friend.”