The Spanish Civil War: Harbinger of World War II (on Antony Beevor’s The Battle for Spain: The Spanish Civil War 1936–1939; Paul Preston’s The Spanish Civil War: Reaction, Revolution, and Revenge, revised and expanded edition, and We Saw Spain Die: Foreign Correspondents in the Spanish Civil War; Henry Buckley’s The Life and Death of the Spanish Republic: A Witness to the Spanish Civil War; Stanley G. Payne’s The Spanish Civil War; Nick Lloyd’s Forgotten Places: Barcelona and the Spanish Civil War; ¡No Pasarán!: Writings from the Spanish Civil War, edited by Pete Ayrton; George Orwell’s Homage to Catalonia; Enrique Moradiellos’s Franco: Anatomy of a Dictator; Mercè Rodoreda’s In Diamond Square, translated by Peter Bush; Emili Teixidor’s Black Bread, translated by Peter Bush; Lydie Salvayre’s Cry, Mother Spain, translated by Ben Faccini; and Manuel Rivas’s The Low Voices, translated by Jonathan Dunne)

Karen Swenson has published five volumes of poetry, been included in numerous anthologies, and appeared in The New Yorker, Saturday Review, Poetry, Commonweal, Miramar, The Nation, and other publications. Also the author of travel and political articles for the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, Swenson presently lives in Barcelona, Spain.

Parts of a Poet: Lensing’s Stevens (on George S. Lensing’s Making the Poem: Stevens’ Approaches)

After T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land appeared in 1922, it was hailed as the pre-eminent text of poetic modernism. A pastiche drawn largely from the past, the poem was understood to be making a trenchant comment on the disillusioned …

Stan Sanvel Rubin is a poet and educator whose work has appeared in The Georgia Review, AGNI, the Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Kenyon Review, and many more. His fourth full collection of poetry, There. Here., was published by Lost Horse Press in 2013; his third, Hidden Sequel (Barrow Street Press, 2006), won the Barrow Street Poetry Book Prize. Additionally, his interviews with poets have been widely published over the years. Rubin lives on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state and writes annual essay-reviews of poetry for Water-Stone Review.

“As Complicated and Elusive as Reality”: María Berrio’s Many-Layered Collages (with an interview by C. J. Bartunek)

INTRODUCTION

The creator of striking large-scale multimedia collages that “blur biographical memory with South American mythology,” María Berrio is a Colombian-born artist living and working in New York City. A graduate of the Parsons School of Design (BFA) and the …

María Berrio is a Colombian-born artist living and working in New York City. A graduate of the Parsons School of Design (BFA) and the School of Visual Art (MFA), Berrio has exhibited her work in solo and group exhibitions throughout the world, most recently at the Prospect 4 triennial in New Orleans. She has also created murals in Harlem and in Puebla, Mexico, and is currently working with NYC’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority to mount a public work titled There Is Magic Underneath It All

Ode to Whitman’s “They do not think whom they souse with spray”; Ode to Tennyson’s “Some one had blunder’d”; Ode to Frost’s “And they, since they / Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.”

Kimiko Hahn, author of nine books, finds that disparate sources have influenced her work—among them black lung disease, Flaubert’s sex tour, exhumation, and classical Japanese literary/poetic forms. Rarified fields of science prompted her latest poetry collections, Toxic Flora (2010) and Brain Fever (2014), both from W. W. Norton. A new collection, Foreign Bodies, is forthcoming in 2020. Hahn’s honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry, and a Shelley Memorial Award. She is a distinguished professor in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Literary Translation at Queens College, City University of New York.

Coltrane

Richard Terrill, professor emeritus at Minnesota State University–Mankato, is the author of two collections of poems from the University of Tampa Press, Almost Dark (2010) and Coming Late to Rachmaninoff (2003), the latter a winner of the Minnesota Book Award. He is also the author of two books of creative nonfiction, Fakebook: Improvisations on a Journey Back to Jazz—Terrill plays jazz saxophone—and Saturday Night in Baoding: A China Memoir (University of Arkansas Press), winner of the AWP Prize for Creative Nonfiction. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the state art boards of Wisconsin and Minnesota, the Jerome Foundation, the MacDowell Colony, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. His work has appeared in journals such as the Iowa Review, North American Review, River Teeth, New Letters, and Crazyhorse.

I Am Learning

Suzi F. Garcia is an editor at Noemi Press, a CantoMundo Fellow, a Macondista, and a representative for the Latinx Caucus. Her writing has been featured or is forthcoming in The Offing, Vinyl, Fence, and elsewhere.

I’m a Guest at the Wedding of Horowitz’s; Farmers, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky—What They Didn’t Say; Balloon Man; Lakehurst; & Sunset

Edward Wilson’s poems have appeared in the American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, The Georgia Review, the Midwest Quarterly, Poetry, Southern Poetry Review, the South Carolina Review, and others. His awards include an individual artist fellowship from the state of Georgia, a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Fellowship, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. He lives in Augusta, Georgia.

This Preparation of All Things Autumnal

Felicia Zamora is the author of the forthcoming Body of Render, winner of the 2018 Benjamin Saltman Award (Red Hen Press, 2020); Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize (University of Notre Dame Press, 2017); & in Open, Marvel (Parlor Press, 2018); and Instrument of Gaps (Slope Editions, 2018). She won the 2015 Tomaž Šalamun Prize from Verse, has authored two chapbooks, and was the 2017 Poet Laureate of Fort Collins, Colorado. Her published works may be found or are forthcoming in Alaska Quarterly Review, Crazyhorse, jubilat, Lana Turner, North American Review, Prairie Schooner, The Nation, West Branch, and others. She is the associate poetry editor for Colorado Review, holds an MFA in creative writing from Colorado State University, and is the education programs manager for the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University.

Annunciation

Leila Chatti is a Tunisian-American poet and the inaugural Anisfield-Wolf Fellow in Writing and Publishing at Cleveland State University. She is the author of the chapbooks Ebb (New-Generation African Poets Series, Akashic Books) and Tunsiya/Amrikiya, the 2017 Editor’s Selection from Bull City Press. Individually, her poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Tin House, the American Poetry Review, and elsewhere.