She Did Not Speak

Wir sagen uns Dunkles
                       —Paul Celan

 

It began so quietly that no one could hear it.

How to begin a story that can never be told? For a long time, I started to tell the story by not telling …

Leslie Morris is a professor of German at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as director of the Center for Jewish Studies. She is the author, most recently, of The Translated Jew: German Jewish Culture outside the Margins (Northwestern University Press, 2018). Currently she is writing a hybrid memoir.

Can I Tell You Something Funny?—An Interview with George Singleton

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.

Standard Hole

My truck’s compromised radiator steaming, I pulled off for pepper flakes, expecting nothing more than having to call Triple A if I couldn’t fix the situation. This was in the parking lot of a place called Halfway Barbecue, down on …

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

None

1.

Hazel Hicks was the first “None” to graduate Crossley State College as a religion major. Hazel herself thought it nothing special. She thought it an obvious choice for someone like her. Which is to say, a person who took …

David Huddle taught at the University of Vermont for thirty-eight years, and he continues to teach at the Bread Loaf School of English. His most recent books are Dream Sender, a poetry collection (LSU Press, 2015), and My Immaculate Assassin, a novel (Tupelo Press, 2016). In 2019 his new novel Hazel will be published by Tupelo, and his new poetry collection, My Surly Heart, by LSU.

What Anyone Would Feel

Deborah Forbes’s work has appeared in the Hudson Review, Electric Literature, and the Carolina Quarterly. She is a recovering academic and the author of Sincerity’s Shadow: Self-Consciousness in British Romantic and Mid-Twentieth-Century American Poetry (Harvard University Press, 2004). She lives in Clifton, Virginia, with her husband and daughters.

An Escalation

Kelsey Norris is a writer and editor from Alabama currently living in Washington, D.C. She earned an MFA from Vanderbilt University, where she was the editor-in-chief of Nashville Review. Her work has appeared in the Oxford American and the Kenyon Review (online), and she was a finalist in Narrative’s 2017 fall story contest. 

Hao

 

1966

Qingxin remembers that the character 万comes fromin the Oracle Bone Script—a scorpion with large pincers and a poisonous sting at the end of its jointed tail. How does a bug come to mean ten thousand, as in “毛主席万岁”—…

Ye Chun has published two books of poetry, Lantern Puzzle (Tupelo Press, 2015) and Travel over Water (Bitter Oleander Press, 2005); a novel in Chinese, Peach Tree in the Sea (People’s Literature Publishing House, 2011); and a book of translations, Ripened Wheat: Selected Poems of Hai Zi (Bitter Oleander Press, 2015). She is an assistant professor at Providence College.

Mi Corazón Es Su Corazón

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

on A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall

“Dying is easy. Comedy is hard.” These words, delightful in their oxymoronic truth, were reportedly spoken by the English actor Edmund Kean (1789–1833) on his deathbed. Though variously attributed to comedians and Hollywood actors over many years, this adage could …

Gary Kerley is a retired educator living in Bermuda Run, North Carolina. His reviews and articles have appeared in a number of publications and encyclopedias. An essay on the relationship between James Dickey and Pat Conroy and a review of Henry Taylor’s selected poems, This Tilted World Is Where I Live, will appear in the 2020 issue of The James Dickey Review. His articles on Alice Friman and William Walsh will appear next year on the online New Georgia Encyclopedia.