A Long Wail

Harry Crews (1935–2012), born in Bacon County, was the author of nearly twenty novels, from The Gospel Singer (1968) to An American Family: The Baby with the Curious Markings (2006). His published nonfiction includes the first volume of his autobiography, A Childhood: The Biography of a Place (1978), and three essay collections. His papers are collected in the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Georgia; he was the subject of a special feature, including previously unpublished work and letters culled from that collection, in our Winter 2007 issue. Crews lived for decades in Gainesville, Florida, where he taught at the University of Florida. (Inducted in 2002)

The Snow That Is Nothing in the Triangle

Family Album

I Dated Jane Austen

Forby and the Mayan Maidens

Mary Clearman Blew’s most recent books are This Is Not the Ivy League: A Memoir (University of Nebraska Press) and a novel, Jackalope Dreams (Flyover Fiction), both published in 2011. Two fiction collections, Lambing Out and Other Stories (2001) and Runaway (1990), won Pacific Northwest Booksellers awards, as did her memoir All But the Waltz: Essays on a Montana Family (1991). The winner of a Western Heritage Award and the Western Literature Association’s Distinguished Achievement Award, Blew is a professor of English at the University of Idaho.

Fra Lippi and Me

My Real Estate

The Final Proof of Fate and Circumstance

Lee K. Abbott is the author of seven collections of short fiction, most recently All Things, All at Once: New & Selected Stories (W. W. Norton, 2006). His work has appeared ten times previously in The Georgia Review and in nearly one hundred other periodicals, including the Atlantic, Harper’s, Epoch, Southern Review, and Boulevard. His work has also been featured in Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Awards: Prize Stories, Best of the West, and the Pushcart Prize. Twice a winner of National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Abbott is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor in English at Ohio State University, where he directs the MFA program in creative writing. “The Final Proof of Fate and Circumstance,” the first of Abbott’s eight stories to appear in GR (Fall 1983), was included in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

on Fictions in Autobiography: Studies in the Art of Self-Invention by Paul John Eakin