The rock of this odd coincidence

Penelope Scambly Schott’s most recent book is How I Became an Historian (WordTech Communications, 2016). Her poetry has appeared in American Poetry Review, The Georgia Review, Nimrod, and elsewhere, and she has held fellowships at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos.

Orchestra

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.

The Creation of the Inaudible

Pattiann Rogers has published fourteen books of poetry, most recently Holy Heathen Rhapsody (Penguin, 2013), and a selection of her uncollected poems is forthcoming from Penguin/Random House in 2018. A gathering of 329 journals and magazines containing her poems was recently acquired by Texas Tech University and is housed in the Sowell Family Collection in Literature, Community, and the Natural World.

Crickets

Such Instance

Byron Herbert Reece (1917–1958) was the author of four books of poetry and two novels. During his short career he was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in poetry for Bow Down in Jericho (1950), earned two Guggenheim Fellowships, and served as writer-in-residence at the University of California at Los Angeles, Emory University in Atlanta, and Young Harris College in Towns County, Georgia. Despite being praised by Atlanta Constitution editor and fellow Georgia Writers Hall of Fame honoree Ralph McGill as “one of the really great poets of our time, and one to stand with those of any other time,” Reece never achieved wide recognition. Born near Blood Mountain, Reece often found his studies and writing efforts interrupted by his responsibilities on the family farm and to his parents—both of whom suffered from tuberculosis, a disease he eventually contracted himself. Worn down by depression and illness, Reece took his own life on the campus of Young Harris College in 1958. (Inducted in 2001)

Martyrdom: A Love Poem & Syllogism

Blossom

Stanley Plumly (1939–2019) authored ten collections of poems and four works of nonfiction. Elegy Landscape: Constable and Turner and the Intimate Sublime, his most recent book, was published by W. W. Norton in 2018. His many honors and awards include an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Truman Capote Award, and the Paterson Poetry Prize. He was the founding director of the MFA program in creative writing at the University of Maryland, where he had been a professor of English since 1985. Middle Distance, a collection of poems he finished before his death, will be published by W. W. Norton in 2020.

The Rapture Is Coming

The Printer; Epilogue; & Prologue

Linda Pastan’s fourteenth book of poems, Insomnia, will be published by W. W. Norton in the fall of 2015. Recent poems have appeared in the Paris Review, the Atlantic Monthly, the New Yorker, and the Gettysburg Review. Her books have twice been finalists for the National Book Award, and in 2003 she won the Ruth Lily Prize for lifetime achievement. She was poet laureate of Maryland from 1991 to 1995.