After,

Christopher Kempf is the author of the poetry collection Late in the Empire of Men (Four Way Books, 2017). Recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and a Wallace Stegner fellowship from Stanford University, he is a doctoral candidate in English literature at the University of Chicago.

Muse

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Nighttime Ride

The dad had a sweet tooth; it was something fierce. When it got ahold of him, no matter where he was—clearing invasives on the job, taking the kids for a weekend, eating his one-pan dinner—he had to satisfy it, like …

Holly Beth Pratt received her MFA from the University of Florida in 2017. She has interned at Tin House Books and Subtropics, and she is the new associate director at Willow Springs Books. Previous publications can be found in the New England Review and Lunch Ticket. Originally from South Africa, she now lives in Washington State.

Cottonwoods

Rex Adams, originally from Coulee City, Washington, currently resides in Owyhee County near Marsing, Idaho. His work has appeared in several print and online journals, including CRAFT, Confrontation, Sky Island Journal, and The Cabin’s Writers in the Attic: Song Anthology. He makes his living in the construction industry and is the father of two young daughters.

Benessere

 Nico drove with one hand caressing the steering wheel, the very picture of the bella figura so fundamental to Italian manhood. His other arm lay along the seatback, his hand cupping my shoulder. It was a sparkling, chilly November morning. …

Ann Harleman is the author of the story collections Thoreau’s Laundry (2007) and Happiness (1994), which won the Iowa Short Fiction Award; her novels are The Year She Disappeared (2008) and Bitter Lake (1996). Her awards include Guggenheim and Rockefeller fellowships. She lived and worked behind the Iron Curtain and has taught at a handful of American colleges—including her current employer, Brown University. She makes her home within sight of San Francisco Bay.

Worthy to Receive, or “Even a blind pig gets a truffle now and then”: Philip Levine and Me

Rick Campbell is a poet and essayist who lives on Alligator Point, Florida.

I Knew Some of Them, But They All Knew Me

Amy Wright is the author of two poetry books, one collaboration, and six chapbooks. Most recently her essays won first place in contests sponsored by London Magazine and Quarterly West. She has also received two Peter Taylor Fellowships to the Kenyon Review Writers Workshop, an Individual Artist Grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission, and a fellowship to Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Wright’s essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Brevity, Fourth Genre, Ninth Letter, and elsewhere.

Works-in-Progress

Authors’ note: This essay began after a conversation about writing and our shared interest in documenting the origin and evolution of our identities as writers. We build all our collaborative essays by responding to one another’s sections until a natural

Brenda Miller is the author of five essay collections, most recently An Earlier Life (Ovenbird Books, 2016), and co-author of Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining, and Publishing Creative Nonfiction (originally published by McGraw-Hill in 2003 and with a third edition coming out this year) with Suzanne Paola and The Pen and The Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World (Skinner House Books, 2012) with Holly J. Hughes. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Tupelo Quarterly, Sweet, Bellevue Literary Review, and Psaltery and Lyre. Recipient of six Pushcart Prizes, she is a professor of English at Western Washington University and an associate faculty member at the Rainier Writing Workshop.

Julie Marie Wade is co-author (with Denise Duhamel) of Unrhymables: Collaborations in Prose (Noctuary Press, 2019). Other works include Same-Sexy Marriage: A Novella in Poems (2018) and When I Was Straight (2014), both from A Midsummer Night’s Press. She teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University and reviews regularly for Lambda Literary Review and The Rumpus. She is married to Angie Griffin and lives on Hollywood Beach.

Taabu and the Vibe

Gerald Majer’s poetry, fiction, and essays have appeared in Callaloo, FIELD, The Georgia Review (several times), Puerto del Sol, Quarterly West, Yale Review, and other journals; his creative-nonfiction book The Velvet Lounge was published by Columbia University Press in 2005. Majer teaches literature and creative writing at Stevenson University in Baltimore, Maryland.