on The Poet’s Art by M. L. Rosenthal

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.

on The Ideal Bakery by Donald Hall

on Female Adolescence: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Works of Literature by Katherine Dalsimer

The Poetry of Ted Hughes: Form and Imagination by Leonard M. Scigaj

on Demand the Impossible: Science Fiction and the Utopian Imagination by Tom Moylan

Much Is Still Left In: Five First Books of Stories (on Resurrectionists by Russell Working; Learning the Mother Tongue by Cathryn Hankla; Temporary Shelter by Mary Gordon; Zero db and Other Stories by Madison Smartt Bell; & Town Smokes by Pinckney Benedict)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

In Search of Roots (on Professing Literature: An Institutional History by Gerald Graff & American Literature and the Academy: The Roots, Growth, and Maturity of a Profession by Kermit Vanderbilt)

To Enlighten, To Embody (on Palladium by Alice Fulton; Under The Vulture-tree by David Bottoms; Lovesick by Gerald Stern; The End of Beauty by Jorie Graham; & Zone Journals by Charles Wright)

Angus, the One-Legged Duckling