Flat Earth Dream Soliloquy

I like the innocent parts of Flat Earth, the bits about reinventing knowledge, but I hate the part that’s borders and brutalism. I get the desire for an edge because I also love the feminine tilt and the endless dip …

Carmen Giménez Smith is the author of seven books, including Cruel Futures (City Lights Publishers, 2018) and Milk and Filth (University of Arizona Press, 2013), the latter a finalist for the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in poetry; earlier collections earned an American Book Award and a Juniper Prize. She is also a publisher of Noemi Press, a codirector for CantoMundo, a professor of English at Virginia Tech, and a poetry editor at The Nation. Graywolf will publish her Be Recorder in 2019.

We Could See

Derek Sheffield’s poetry collection Through the Second Skin (Orchises Press, 2013) was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His work has also appeared recently in the Gettysburg Review, the Southern Review, and AGNI. He lives with his family on the east slopes of the Cascades and is the poetry editor of Terrain.org.

Apocalypse with Crumbs

Kien Lam is a Kundiman Fellow, 2017 Best New Poet, and Indiana University MFA alumnus. His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Poetry Review, The Nation, the Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. He lives in Los Angeles, where he writes about esports.

Sideways with Saint Peter

T. S. Dillon lives on a small cattle farm in North Alabama with his wife and two daughters. His work has appeared in the Kenyon Review, Carolina Quarterly, and Nashville Review. He holds an MDiv from Vanderbilt University and an MFA from Spalding University in Louisville, KY.

Toba Khedoori’s Untitled (Table and Chair) (1999)

Yxta Maya Murray is a writer and law professor living in Los Angeles. Her seventh novel is forthcoming in 2021 from Northwestern University Press, and her first collection of short fiction will be published by University of Nevada Press.

The Remembered Past in a Changing World

Lauret Savoy works to unearth what is buried and to re-member what is fragmented, shattered, eroded. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Native American heritage, she writes about this country’s origins and their varied places in our storytelling. She has written and edited many books, including Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape (Counterpoint Press, 2015), which won the 2016 American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation; The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity and the Natural World (Milkweed Editions, 2002); and Bedrock: Writers on the Wonders of Geology (Trinity University Press, 2006). Savoy is the David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies and Geology at Mount Holyoke College, a photographer, and a pilot. Winner of an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, she has also held fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution and Yale University.

Remorse

Dawne Shand grew up in Alabama’s Black Belt and attended Selma’s public schools during their first two decades of integration. Since then, she has lived and worked in Nice, London, and Boston. Her work has appeared in the Kenyon Review and Southern Cultures.

Rebellions of the Body, Creations of the Mind

Fourteen doctors puzzled over my symptoms before a fifteenth finally presented the results of an eight-hundred-dollar allergy test explaining my seven years of debilitating digestive issues. I stopped eating everything on the list—basil, oranges, raspberries, artichokes, asparagus, mustard, melon, oregano, …

J. D. Ho has an MFA from the Michener Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Ho’s poems and essays have appeared in North American Review, Ninth Letter, Crab Orchard Review, and other journals.

Darwin and Dickinson among the Heliotropes

Anne Goldman’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the Guardian, The Georgia Review, the Gettysburg Review, and the Southwest Review, among other venues. Her essays have been named as notable in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature Writing, and the Best American Travel Writing. Nominated for a National Magazine Award, she is the recipient of fellowships from the Ahmanson/Getty Foundation and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Goldman is Professor of English at Sonoma State University. She is at work upon a second nonfiction manuscript, “An Aria for Insects and Other Essays.”