Challenging the Hierarchies (on Reading in Detail: Aesthetics and the Feminine by Naomi Schor; The Pirate’s Fiancee: Feminism, Reading, Postmodernism by Meaghan Morris; & The Feminist Spectator as Critic by Jill Dolan and Ann Arbor)

Unfinished Lives of Sylvia Plath (on Sylvia Plath: A Biography by Linda Wagner-Martin & Bitter Fame: A Life of Sylvia Plath by Anne Stevenson)

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

Ambiguous Womeriy Unwomanly Ambitions (on Life/lines: Theorizing Women’s Autobiography by Bella Brodzki and Celeste Schenck; The Private Self: Theory and Practice of Women’s Autobiographical Writings by Shari Benstock; & Writing a Woman’s Life by Carolyn G. Heilbrun)

Some Recent Herstories (on Obscene Gestures for Women by Janet Kauffman; After You’ve Gone by Alice Adams; Light Can Be Both Wave and Particle by Ellen Gilchrist; Confessions of a Bad Girl by Bette Pesetsky; & The Women Who Walk by Nancy Huddleston Packer)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Achieving Women (on Building Domestic Liberty: Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Architectural Feminism by Polly Wynn Allen; Ellen Glasgow’s Reasonable Doubts: A Collection of Her Writings by Julius Rowan Raper; & Gender, Race, and Region in the Writings of Grace King, Ruth McEnery Stuart, And Kate Chopin by Helen Taylor)

A Want Ad (on Parties by Elizabeth Seydel Morgan; Where the World Is by Janet Kauffman; Green the Witch-hazel Wood by Emily Hiestand; Waving from Shore by Lisel Mueller; & Grace Notes by Rita Dove)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Watching Great-Grandma Bean Undress

Laurie Kutchins’ three books of poetry include The Night Path (BOA Editions, 1997), which received the Isabella Gardner Award. Her poems and lyric essays have appeared previously in The Georgia Review, Southern Review, Orion, the New Yorker, and elsewhere. She directs the creative writing program at James Madison University.