Statistic: The Witness

Rita Dove, born in 1952 in Akron, Ohio, earned degrees from Miami University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her record of achievement is unprecedented. When in February 2011 she received the National Medal of Arts from President Barack Obama, she became the first person to have received all three of the country’s highest arts distinctions—the others being the Humanities Medal and a term of service as Poet Laureate (2003–5). She has been a frequent guest of Bill Moyers’ PBS series. In 1987, she received the Pulitzer Prize for her third collection of poems, Thomas and Beulah, which is loosely based on her maternal grandparents’ lives. She also has nine other volumes of poetry: Collected Poems 1974–2004 (2016), Sonata Mulattica (2009), American Smooth (2004), On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999), Mother Love (1995), Selected Poems (1993), Grace Notes (1989), Museum (1983), and The Yellow House on the Corner (1980). She has published a collection of essays, The Poet’s World (1995); a drama, The Darker Face of the Earth: A Verse Play in Fourteen Scenes (1994); a novel, Through the Ivory Gate (1992); and a collection of short stories, Fifth Sunday (1985). She has edited two volumes, The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry (2011) and The Best American Poetry 2000 (2000). From 2004 to 2006, Dove served as the Poet Laureate of Virginia. She holds twenty-five honorary doctorates, is a classically trained musician (viola de gamba), and has done numerous musical collaborations, including Seven for Luck, seven poems by Rita Dove with music by John Williams, and Umoja: Each One of Us Counts, music by Alvin Singleton, commissioned by the Atlanta Olympic Summer Games. Since 1989, she has taught at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where she holds the chair of Commonwealth Professor of English.

Eine Kleine Nachtmusik

Elton Glaser has published eight full-length collections of poetry, most recently two books in 2013: Translations from the Flesh (University of Pittsburgh Press) and The Law of Falling Bodies (University of Arkansas Press).

The Space for Grief

Heartsick

Phillip Sterling’s most recent books are the poetry collection And Then Snow (Main Street Rag) and, as editor, Isle Royale from the AIR: Poems, Stories, and Songs from 25 Years of Artists-in-Residence (Caffeinated Press), both released in 2017. He has served as artist-in-residence for both Isle Royale National Park and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

Killing the Covenant: The Savage Idolatry of the New World Order

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

on Reverse Tradition: Postmodern Fictions and the Nineteenth-Century Novel by Robert Kiely

on The Bread of Time: Toward an Autobiography by Philip Levine

Five Chapbooks Out of Many (on Gratitude to Old Teachers by Robert Bly; Kyrie for One Voice by Margaret Holley; Reflections of a White Bear by Carolyn E. Campbell; Love for Other Things; New and Selected Poems by Tom Hennen; & Jewel Weed by Diane Swan)

Related Stories (on Moses Supposes by Ellen Currie; Silent Passengers by Larry Woiwode; All My Relations by Christopher Mcllroy; Home at Last by Jean McGarry; & Various Antidotes by Joanna Scott)

Erin McGraw is the author of six books, most recently the novel Better Food for a Better World (Slant Books, 2013). Her stories and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, The Atlantic, STORY, the Southern Review, Allure, and other magazines and journals. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, the poet Andrew Hudgins.