Three Short Tales

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Riffs and Reciprocities

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

The Cult of the Adolescent: Commercial Indoctrination and the Collapse of Civic Virtue

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

Does Style Make the Woman (on The Beacon Book of Essays by Contemporary American Women, edited by Wendy Martin; Wild Ride: Earthquakes, Sneezes and Other Thrills by Bia Lowe; Writing the World by Kelly Cherry; Field of Vision by Lisa Knopp; and Never in a Hurry: Essays on People and Places by Naomi Shihab Nye)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Nor Good Red Herring: Novellas and Stories (on What They Tell You to Forget: A Novella and Stories by Fred Pfeil; Flights in the Heavenlies by Ernest J. Finney; Solo Spinout: Stories and a Novella by Ann Nietzke; Because We Are Here by Chuck Wachtel; and Ship Fever and Other Stories by Andrea Barrett)

Erin McGraw is the author of six books, most recently the novel Better Food for a Better World (Slant Books, 2013). Her stories and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, The Atlantic, STORY, the Southern Review, Allure, and other magazines and journals. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, the poet Andrew Hudgins.

 

Constructing the Icons of Popular Culture (on Wanted Dead or Alive: The American West In Popular Culture, edited by Richard Aquila; Inventing the Public Enemy: The Gangster in American Culture, 1918-1934 by David E. Ruth; 100 Years on the Road: The Traveling Salesman in American Culture by Timothy B. Spears; Judgment and Grace in Dixie: Southern Faiths from Faulkner to Elvis by Charles Reagan Wilson; and God in the Stadium: Sports and Religion in America by Robert J. Higgs)

A Convention of Things (on Desiring Flight by Christianne Balk; Living at the Epicenter by Allison Funk; Internal Strategies by Anita Feng; Loosestrife by Stephen Dunn; and Flying Blind by Sharon Bryan)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Poetry Chapbooks: Fact, Fiction, and Forecast (on Glass Walker by Imogene L. Bolls; Making Wings by Christopher Bursk; The Mythology of Dark and Light by Hayden Carruth; Daily Horoscope by Dana Gioia; Upstairs Window by Judith Kitchen; At the House of the Tin Man by Robert McDowell; Turning Out the Stones by Marc Harshman;Any Act of Leaving by Susan Powell; Across Water by Nancy Simpson; &amp The Stories In The Light by Michael Waters)

The Invention of Zero

Rebecca McClanahan is the author of ten books, most recently The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change (Indiana University Press, 2013) and a revised edition of Word Painting: The Fine Art of Writing Descriptively (Writer’s Digest Books, 2014). Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, Kenyon Review, The Georgia Review, and The Sun, and in anthologies published by Doubleday, Norton, Putnam, Penguin, Beacon, St. Martin’s, and numerous others.