Piecework: The Longer Poem Returns (on Corvus by Anselm Hollo; Muse & Drudge by Harryette Mullen; The Invention of the Zero by Richard Kenney; and Kyrie by Ellen Bryant Voigt)

on Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties by Peter Biskind

Dispatches from the Culture Wars (on The Myth of Political Correctness: The Conservative Attack on Higher Education by John K. Wilson; The Twilight of Common Dreams: Why America Is Wracked by Culture Wars by Todd Gitlin; & Professional Correctness: Literary Studies and Political Change by Stanley Fish)

American Theater Watch, 1995–1996

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Harvest Song

Fiddle

R. T. Smith is writer-in-residence at Washington and Lee University, where he edits Shenandoah. The latest of his many books are Outlaw Style: Poems (University of Arkansas Press, 2007) and a collection of stories, The Calaboose Epistles (Iris Press, 2009). His work has been reprinted in such notable anthologies as Best American Poetry, Best American Short Stories, and the Pushcart Prize.

What’s Candy to an Artist?

Jim Heynen’s short-short stories have appeared frequently in The Georgia Review. A new collection of his short-shorts, Ordinary Sins: After Theophrastus, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2014. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

On a Print by Hiroshige

Searching for Depth in Bonaire

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.