Another Autumn

Linda Pastan’s fourteenth book of poems, Insomnia, will be published by W. W. Norton in the fall of 2015. Recent poems have appeared in the Paris Review, the Atlantic Monthly, the New Yorker, and the Gettysburg Review. Her books have twice been finalists for the National Book Award, and in 2003 she won the Ruth Lily Prize for lifetime achievement. She was poet laureate of Maryland from 1991 to 1995.

Imps

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

These Privileges Doth the Wolf Hold to This Hour

on The Modern Poetic Sequence: The Genius of Modern Poetry by M. L. Rosenthal, Sally M. Gall

Authors in Hell

Echo and Narcissus: The Fearful Logic of Postmodern Thought

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

on Hello, Stranger: Beach Poems by Robert Dana

The Name, the Things, the Mystery (on The Name of The Rose by Umberto Eco, William Weaver)

on The Least You Need to Know by Lee Martin

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.