on Afterings by Deborah Tall

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

A Personal Map of the Past (on Edward McPherson’s The History of the Future: American Essays)

Sebastian Stockman’s reviews have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Wall Street Journal, and the Boston Globe, and other newspapers. His essays have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Millions, and Pangyrus, among other outlets. He is associate teaching professor of English at Northeastern University.

Footprints (on John Gimlette’s Elephant Complex: Travels in Sri Lanka; Rob Schmitz’s Street of Eternal Happiness; Robert Moor’s On Trails; Richard Tillinghast’s Journeys into the Mind of the World: A Book of Places; and Malachy Tallack’s The Un-Discovered Islands)

Samuel Pickering, the author of more thirty books, which span several genres, was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. He taught English for forty-five years, thirty-five of them at the University of Connecticut. His most recent book is Parade’s End, published by Mercer University Press in 2018. “Reading Pickering,” a reviewer wrote in the Smithsonian decades ago, “is like taking a walk with your oldest, wittiest friend.”

Apostrophe to S

Ted Mathys is the author of three books of poetry, Null Set (2015), The Spoils (2009), and Forge (2005), all from Coffee House Press. He has received fellowships and awards from the NEA, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Poetry Society of America, and Saint Louis Regional Arts Commission. He studied poetry at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and now lives in Saint Louis, where he teaches at Saint Louis University and co-curates the 100 Boots Poetry Series at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation.

Burning the Old Store

Rachel Rinehart’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in journals including New Ohio Review, Prairie Schooner, Massachusetts Review, Indiana Review, and Colorado Review. Her poetry collection The Church in the Plains was recently se-lected by Peter Everwine as the winner of the 2016 Philip Levine Poetry Prize and is forthcoming from Anhinga Press in January 2018. Rinehart grew up in Chuckery, Ohio, and currently teaches at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia.

The Cartographer Gets Lost; Self-Portrait as Alone with Thoughts; & Pisces

­Erin Adair-Hodges is the winner of the 2016 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize for her first poetry collection, Let’s All Die Happy (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017). Adair-Hodges earned an MFA from the University of Arizona and then quit writing poetry; eight years later, her first accepted poem won The Georgia Review’s 2014 Loraine Williams Poetry Prize. Since then, her work has been published in Boulevard, Crazyhorse, Green Mountains Review, Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner, Radar and more. Adair-Hodges is currently the visiting assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Toledo.

I Want Back Everything I’ve Laid on the Altar & When Lightning Split the Plum Tree

Kaveh Akbar is the founding editor of Divedapper. His poems have appeared recently in the New YorkerPoetryThe NationPloughshares, and elsewhere. His first book, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, is just out with Alice James in the U.S. and Penguin Books in the UK.

Desert Storm & Bear Man Martin Spills the Beans

R. T. Smith is writer-in-residence at Washington and Lee University, where he edits Shenandoah. The latest of his many books are Outlaw Style: Poems (University of Arkansas Press, 2007) and a collection of stories, The Calaboose Epistles (Iris Press, 2009). His work has been reprinted in such notable anthologies as Best American Poetry, Best American Short Stories, and the Pushcart Prize.

The Border Guard

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press.