Outside the Door

Robert Cording has published eight collections of poems, most recently Only So Far (CavanKerry Press, 2015) and A Word in My Mouth: Selected Spiritual Poems (Wipf and Stock, 2013). He has received two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships in poetry and two poetry grants from the Connecticut Commission of the Arts. His poems have appeared in numerous publications such as the Nation, the Southern Review, Poetry, the Hudson Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Orion, and the New Yorker.

Speak to Me

Marianne Boruch’s ten poetry collections include the recent title The Anti-Grief (Copper Canyon Press, 2019). She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia last year at the University of Canberra’s International Poetry Studies Institute, observing the astonishing wildlife to write a book-length sequence, a neo-ancient/medieval bestiary, which is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. The poems in this issue are a part of that collection.

What’s Wrong with Me?

The end of the world

is not what’s wrong with me.

 

Old age, illness, and death

are not wrong. They just are.

 

A stone says, Wake up,

exactly this is all there is!

 

Everything says it—

 

Chase Twichell’s most recent book is Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New & Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010), which won both the Kingsley Tufts Award from Claremont Graduate University and the Balcones Poetry Prize. A new book, Things as It Is, is forthcoming from Copper Canyon in 2018.

Driving the West Desert at Night

Lance Larsen is a former poet laureate of Utah and the author of five collections, most recently What the Body Knows (Tampa Press, 2017). He has won a number of awards, including a Pushcart Prize and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. A professor at BYU, he recently co-directed a theater study abroad program in London.

The Proposal

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Impermanent Man

Kent Nelson has identified 767 species of North American birds and has traveled to the most remote areas of the U.S. and Canada, including Attu (the last Aleutian Island), the Dry Tortugas, and Newfoundland. His story collection, The Spirit Bird (University of Pittsburgh Press), won the 2014 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. “Out of the Darkness” is one of seven linked works in a collection-in-progress, “Charleston Stories,” three of which have appeared in The Georgia Review. He lives in Ouray, Colorado.

Creekboy

Joe Wilkins is the author of a memoir, The Mountain and the Fathers: Growing Up on the Big Dry (Counterpoint, 2013), winner of a 2014 GLCA New Writers Award—an honor that has previously recognized early work by the likes of Richard Ford, Louise Erdrich, and Alice Munro. He also has three books of poems, most recently When We Were Birds (University of Arkansas Press, 2016), winner of the 2017 Stafford/Hall Prize in Poetry from the Oregon Book Awards. His debut novel, And Ever These Bull Mountains, will be published by Little, Brown in the spring of 2018. Wilkins lives with his family in western Oregon, where he teaches writing at Linfield College.

The Calamity Prayer

Go West, young man: the first commandment of American dogma, and the last. Lewis and Clark heeded it in 1804, Kerouac and Cassidy in 1947. On foot or horse or motorcycle, in steamboat or convertible, we the people, as …

Mairead Small Staid is the 2017–18 George Bennett Fellow at Phillips Exeter Academy, where she is at work on her first book. Her poems and essays have appeared in AGNI, the Believer, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.

Transition: The Renaming of Hope

I will miss Anne, with the well-placed e and easy shape. Steep climb, perfect point, and the slide into the runout of three short, round letters. The way the letters smooth across the page in a tiny creek of …

Molly Cooney is a queer writer, mother, and teacher who spends as much time as possible outdoors. Her work can be found in the Gettysburg Review and the North Dakota Quarterly, among others, and she is a winner of The Loft Literary Center Mentor Series Award and the University of Arizona Poetry Center Manuscript Award. Cooney recently finished a manuscript about leading an Arctic canoeing expedition and is currently writing about life with her trans partner. She lives in Minneapolis, where she teaches writing.