Making Sure There’s Music: Six Recent Chapbooks (on First Hand by Jay Rogoff; The Lazarus Method by Kate Hancock; The Corner of Absence by Lynne Kuderko; Wherever You Want by Douglas Goetsch; This Book Belongs to Eva by Stephen Gardner; and It’s Hard to Get the Angle Right by Bruce Bennett)

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

“Mystery every time”: Memoirs and the Search for “We” (on Space: A Memoir by Jesse Lee Kercheval; The Phantom Father: A Memoir by Barry Gifford; and Snake’s Daughter: The Roads In and Out of War by Gail Hosking Gilberg)

Maturities (on Questions for Ecclesiastes by Mark Jarman; Dithyrambs by Richard Katrovas; When by Baron Wormser; Clemency by Colette Inez; and Sinking Creek by John Engels)

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Moral Protest, or How to Get Riled Up about Almost Everything (on The Art of Moral Protest: Culture, Biography, and Creativity in Social Movements by James M. Jasper; Culture of Intolerance: Chauvinism, Class, and Racism in the United States by Mark Nathan Cohen; and Redeeming Culture: American Religion in an Age of Science by James Gilbert)

Rehearsal in Summer

American Theater Watch, 1997–1998

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Canonical

Ears

Burn Man on a Texas Porch