The Lone Tree

Seven Roses & The Fire and the Rose

Waiting for a Miracle: A Jew Goes Fishing

Marjorie Sandor’s forthcoming memoir, The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction (Arcade/Skyhorse Publishing), will be her fourth book. Her linked story collection, Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime (Sarabande, 2003), followed A Night of Music (Ecco, 1989) and won the National Jewish Book Award in Fiction; eight of her stories have appeared in GR. Sandor’s volume of essays The Night Gardener: A Search for Home (Lyons Press, 1999) won the 2000 Oregon Book Award for Literary Nonfiction, and her work has appeared in the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies, among others. Sandor directs the MFA program in creative writing at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

Where Is Fire Headed?

Paul Hamill, who returns to The Georgia Review’s pages after two decades, is a retired college administrator and English professor. His work appears in many journals, including Mudlark and Front Porch Review. The latest of his four collections of poetry is a chapbook, Meeting the Minotaur (Split Oak Press, 2011).

Méthode Champenoise

Liza Wieland’s third novel, A Watch of Nightingales (University of Michigan Press, 2009), won the Michigan Literary Fiction Award; her others are Bombshell (2001) and The Names of the Lost (1992), both from Southern Methodist University Press—which also published the second and third of her three story collections: You Can Sleep While I Drive (1999) and Quickening (2010). Wieland has won grants from the NEA, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, and the North Carolina Arts Council, as well as two Pushcart prizes. She teaches at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

We Did Not Fear the Father

Charles Fort’s books include We Did Not Fear the Father: New and Selected Poems (Red Hen Press, 2012) and Mrs. Belladonna’s Supper Club Waltz: New and Selected Prose Poems (Backwaters Press, 2010). Born in working-class New Britain, Connecticut, he is the founder of the Wendy Fort Foundation Theater of Fine Arts. Fort is currently at work on Sorrow Road, a collection of one hundred villanelles, and a novel, The Last Black Hippie in Connecticut.

Mango

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

My Father’s Hundredth Birthday

Leaving Latitude: Emily Dickinson and Indian Pipes