Meditation on Today’s Limit of Pleasure

Rick Campbell is a poet and essayist who lives on Alligator Point, Florida.

Bad Boy

Lee Martin, who teaches in the MFA program at Ohio State University, is the author of five novels, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Bright Forever (Shaye Areheart Books, 2005). His most recent book is a story collection, The Mutual UFO Network (Dzanc Books, 2018).

A Postmortem Guide

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

on Flight Dreams: A Life in the Midwestern Landscape by Lisa Knopp

on The World Wars through the Female Gaze by Jean Gallagher

Catherine Rogers teaches English at Savannah State University. Her work has appeared in Kalliope: A Journal of Women’s Art, Paideuma, and Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, as well as in the online journals Autumn Sky Poetry and Touch: The Journal of Healing. She cherishes happy memories of having been the very first graduate editorial assistant of The Georgia Review.

on The Only Thing That Counts: The Ernest Hemingway–Maxwell Perkins Correspondence, 1925-1947 edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

on In Plato’s Cave by Alvin Kernan

A Flash and an Hour (on The Calfbearer by Ida Affleck Graves; Fire & Flower by Laura Kasischke; Donkey Gospel by Tony Hoagland; The Old Liberators: New and Selected Poems and Translations by Robert Hedin; & Extranjera by Lola Haskins)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

What We Talk About When We Talk About “Science” (on Cultural Boundaries of Science: Credibility on the Line by Thomas F. Gieryn; Muddling Through: Pursuing Science and Truths in the 21st Century by Michael Fortun and Herbert J. Bernstein; and The Truth Of Uncertainty: Beyond Ideology in Science and Literature by Edward L. Galligan)