On the Killing Fields

It Could Be Anything

Increase

Lia Purpura’s new collection of poems is It Shouldn’t Have Been Beautiful (Penguin/Viking, 2015). She is Writer-in-Residence at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Youthful Journals

Workers for the Lord

Neil Carpathios’ poetry volumes are Beyond the Bones (FutureCycle Press, 2009), At the Axis of Imponderables (winner of the Quercus Review Press Book Award, 2007), and Playground of Flesh (Main Street Rag Press, 2006). He is coordinator of creative writing at Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio.

Sunday Sublime

Ania

Michael Downs’s books include The Greatest Show: Stories (LSU Press, 2012) and House of Good Hope: A Promise for a Broken City (University of Nebraska Press, 2007), which won the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize. His recent writing has been published or is forthcoming in the Southern Review, River Teeth, and Sport Literate. Among his awards are fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Maryland State Arts Council, and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Burning the Letters

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Squatting & Snake Fence

Robert Morgan’s most recent book of poems is Terroir (Penguin, 2011). He is the author of the best-selling novel Gap Creek (1999) and the nonfiction books Boone: A Biography (2007) and Lions of the West (2011)—all three from Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. A sequel to Gap Creek, The Road from Gap Creek, will be published in 2013. His honors include an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; the Thomas Wolfe Prize; and the Hanes Award for Poetry from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. A native of western North Carolina, he has taught at Cornell University since 1971.