Sunday Sublime

Ania

Michael Downs’s books include The Greatest Show: Stories (LSU Press, 2012) and House of Good Hope: A Promise for a Broken City (University of Nebraska Press, 2007), which won the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize. His recent writing has been published or is forthcoming in the Southern Review, River Teeth, and Sport Literate. Among his awards are fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Maryland State Arts Council, and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Burning the Letters

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Squatting & Snake Fence

Robert Morgan’s most recent book of poems is Terroir (Penguin, 2011). He is the author of the best-selling novel Gap Creek (1999) and the nonfiction books Boone: A Biography (2007) and Lions of the West (2011)—all three from Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. A sequel to Gap Creek, The Road from Gap Creek, will be published in 2013. His honors include an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; the Thomas Wolfe Prize; and the Hanes Award for Poetry from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. A native of western North Carolina, he has taught at Cornell University since 1971.

The Hemlock Tree

The Sound of a Meadowlark

Mary Odden’s essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, Nimrod, and Northwest Review, and have been anthologized in Under Northern Lights: Writers and Artists View the Northern Landscape and elsewhere. She owned and ran a community newspaper in Glennallen, Alaska, the Copper River Record, for five years; she now works as an aviation dispatcher for the National Park Service during the summers and in the winter teaches English at Prince William Sound Community College.

Table Prayer

Keith Ratzlaff teaches poetry and literature at Central College in Pella, Iowa. His most recent books of poetry, Then, A Thousand Crows (2009) and Dubious Angels: Poems after Paul Klee (2005), are from Anhinga Press, as will be his next, Who’s Asking? His poems and reviews have appeared recently in the Cincinnati Review, Arts and Letters, Colorado Review, and the American Reader; his honors include the Theodore Roethke Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2009. 

Beatitude

Glenfillan Sheepdog Trials

Brendan Galvin is the author of sixteen poetry collections, most recently Habitat: New and Selected Poems, 1965–2005 (2005), a finalist for the National Book Award; Ocean Effects (2007); and Whirl Is King (2008)—all from Louisiana State University Press. His translation of Sophocles’ Women of Trachis appeared in the Penn Greek Drama Series (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998).