on WHEREAS by Layli Long Soldier

Whereas speaking itself is defiance.

—Layli Long Soldier

I.

In the discourse of law the term whereas signals a recitation of the important context in a formal or contractual document—but it also represents non-binding language. In the discourse of …

Katie Kane is a writer, activist, and professor of cultural studies, English literature, and globalization and colonial studies at the University of Montana. She is the cultural editor of Lavil: Life, Love, and Death in Port-au-Prince (McSweeney’s Voice of Witness Book Series, 2017), and she has published critical work and fiction in journals such as Cultural Studies, Critical Inquiry, and Black Warrior Review. Kane is at work on a study of the legislative and literary history of the reservation, and she is completing a collection of short stories based in her home state of North Dakota.

on Afterings by Deborah Tall

Alice Friman’s poetry collections include Blood Weather (LSU Press, 2019), The View from Saturn (LSU Press, 2014), Vinculum (LSU Press, 2011), The Book of the Rotten Daughter (BkMk Press, 2006), Zoo (1999), Inverted Fire (1997), and Reporting from Corinth (1984). A recipient of many honors, including two Pushcart Prizes and inclusion in Best American Poetry, she has been published in Poetry, Ploughshares, The Georgia Review, Gettysburg Review, Plume, Crazyhorse, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was Poet-in-Residence at Georgia College. 

A Personal Map of the Past (on Edward McPherson’s The History of the Future: American Essays)

Sebastian Stockman’s reviews have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Wall Street Journal, and the Boston Globe, and other newspapers. His essays have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Millions, and Pangyrus, among other outlets. He is associate teaching professor of English at Northeastern University.

Footprints (on John Gimlette’s Elephant Complex: Travels in Sri Lanka; Rob Schmitz’s Street of Eternal Happiness; Robert Moor’s On Trails; Richard Tillinghast’s Journeys into the Mind of the World: A Book of Places; and Malachy Tallack’s The Un-Discovered Islands)

Samuel Pickering, the author of more thirty books, which span several genres, was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. He taught English for forty-five years, thirty-five of them at the University of Connecticut. His most recent book is Parade’s End, published by Mercer University Press in 2018. “Reading Pickering,” a reviewer wrote in the Smithsonian decades ago, “is like taking a walk with your oldest, wittiest friend.”

Apostrophe to S

Ted Mathys is the author of three books of poetry, Null Set (2015), The Spoils (2009), and Forge (2005), all from Coffee House Press. He has received fellowships and awards from the NEA, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Poetry Society of America, and Saint Louis Regional Arts Commission. He studied poetry at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and now lives in Saint Louis, where he teaches at Saint Louis University and co-curates the 100 Boots Poetry Series at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation.

Burning the Old Store

Rachel Rinehart’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in journals including New Ohio Review, Prairie Schooner, Massachusetts Review, Indiana Review, and Colorado Review. Her poetry collection The Church in the Plains was recently se-lected by Peter Everwine as the winner of the 2016 Philip Levine Poetry Prize and is forthcoming from Anhinga Press in January 2018. Rinehart grew up in Chuckery, Ohio, and currently teaches at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia.

The Cartographer Gets Lost; Self-Portrait as Alone with Thoughts; & Pisces

­Erin Adair-Hodges is the winner of the 2016 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize for her first poetry collection, Let’s All Die Happy (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017). Adair-Hodges earned an MFA from the University of Arizona and then quit writing poetry; eight years later, her first accepted poem won The Georgia Review’s 2014 Loraine Williams Poetry Prize. Since then, her work has been published in Boulevard, Crazyhorse, Green Mountains Review, Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner, Radar and more. Adair-Hodges is currently the visiting assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Toledo.

I Want Back Everything I’ve Laid on the Altar & When Lightning Split the Plum Tree

Kaveh Akbar is the founding editor of Divedapper. His poems have appeared recently in the New YorkerPoetryThe NationPloughshares, and elsewhere. His first book, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, is just out with Alice James in the U.S. and Penguin Books in the UK.

Desert Storm & Bear Man Martin Spills the Beans

R. T. Smith is writer-in-residence at Washington and Lee University, where he edits Shenandoah. The latest of his many books are Outlaw Style: Poems (University of Arkansas Press, 2007) and a collection of stories, The Calaboose Epistles (Iris Press, 2009). His work has been reprinted in such notable anthologies as Best American Poetry, Best American Short Stories, and the Pushcart Prize.