The Cult of the Adolescent: Commercial Indoctrination and the Collapse of Civic Virtue

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

Bloodline in Ink

A Divine Blindness

Preacher

Up-and-Down Sun: Notes on the Sacred

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.

A Thousand Buddhas

Brenda Miller is the author of five essay collections, most recently An Earlier Life (Ovenbird Books, 2016), and co-author of Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining, and Publishing Creative Nonfiction (originally published by McGraw-Hill in 2003 and with a third edition coming out this year) with Suzanne Paola and The Pen and The Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World (Skinner House Books, 2012) with Holly J. Hughes. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Tupelo Quarterly, Sweet, Bellevue Literary Review, and Psaltery and Lyre. Recipient of six Pushcart Prizes, she is a professor of English at Western Washington University and an associate faculty member at the Rainier Writing Workshop.

Skunk Dreams

Replacing Memory

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.

Reasons of the Body

Scott Russell Sanders lives in the hill country of southern Indiana, where he has written more than twenty books of fiction and nonfiction, including A Conservationist Manifesto (Indiana University Press, 2009) and Hunting for Hope (Beacon Press, 1998). His most recent books (also from IU Press) are Stone Country: Then & Now (2017), a documentary narrative made in collaboration with photographer Jeffrey Wolin, and Dancing in Dreamtime (2016), a collection of eco-science-fiction stories. He is currently finishing his portion of Ordinary Wealth, fifty brief tales written in response to photographs by Peter Forbes.