The Fisher

The Blue Woods

Brendan Galvin is the author of sixteen poetry collections, most recently Habitat: New and Selected Poems, 1965–2005 (2005), a finalist for the National Book Award; Ocean Effects (2007); and Whirl Is King (2008)—all from Louisiana State University Press. His translation of Sophocles’ Women of Trachis appeared in the Penn Greek Drama Series (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998).

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on Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists by Richard Canning

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

on One Stick Song by Sherman Alexie

Contemporary American Fiction Through University Press Filters (on American Dream, American Nightmare: Fiction since 1960 by Kathryn Hume; Violence in the Contemporary American Novel: An End to Innocence by James R. Giles; and The World Is Our Home: Society and Culture in Contemporary Southern Writing, edited by Jeffrey J. Folks and Nancy Summers Folks)

Q & A (on Seatown and Earlier Poems by Conor O’Callaghan; Stone Sky Lifting by Lia Purpura; Turning Over the Earth by Ralph Black; & Nightworks: Poems, 1962-2000 by Marvin Bell)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Articles of Faith (on Pastoralia by George Saunders; One Day in the Life of a Born Again Loser and Other Stories by Helen Norris; Bad Jews and Other Stories by Gerald Shapiro; and The Stories of J. F. Powers by J. F. Powers)

Erin McGraw is the author of six books, most recently the novel Better Food for a Better World (Slant Books, 2013). Her stories and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, The Atlantic, STORY, the Southern Review, Allure, and other magazines and journals. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, the poet Andrew Hudgins.

 

We’ve Been Sleeping Together All Week; Wrong Number After Midnight; & Desperate Measures

David Clewell is the author of several collections of poems—most recently, Taken Somehow By Surprise (University of Wisconsin, 2011). He teaches writing and literature at Webster University in St. Louis and served as Missouri’s poet laureate from 2010–12. His claim to Charlie-the-Tuna-collecting fame is not at all overinflated.