Our Agora

Cate Lycurgus’s poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in American Poetry Review, Tin House, the Iowa Review, and elsewhere. A 2014 Ruth Lilly fellowship finalist, she has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers’ conferences and was recently named one of Narrative’s 30 Under 30 Featured Writers. Lycurgus currently lives south of San Francisco, where she edits interviews for 32 Poems and teaches professional writing to aspiring accountants.

In Praise of My Manicure

Because I was taught all my life to blend in, I want

my fingernails to blend out: like preschoolers

 

who stomp their rain boots in a parking lot, like coins

who wink at you from the scatter-bottom of a

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of four books of poetry, most recently, Oceanic (Copper Canyon Press, 2018). She was recently named a 2020 Guggenheim Fellow. Her writing appears in Poetry, The New York Times Magazine, ESPN, and Tin House. Her book of illustrated nature essays is forthcoming with Milkweed Editions. She serves as poetry faculty for the Writing Workshops in Greece and is professor of English and creative writing in the University of Mississippi’s MFA program.

Boy, Dirty, Aged Twelve

Susan Terris’s most recent books are Take Two: Film Studies (forthcoming in fall 2017) and Memos (2015), both from Omnidawn. She is the author of six books of poetry, sixteen chapbooks, three artist books, and a play; her journal publications include Denver Quarterly and Ploughshares. A poem of hers from FIELD received a Pushcart Prize, and a poem from Memos was selected for Best American Poetry 2015. Terris is editor of Spillway and a poetry editor for Pedestal Magazine.

The Eccentric French Song and Dance Man of Grand Rapids

Kristina Faust is a native of New Jersey living and working in Grand Rapids, MI. She received her MFA from the University of Michigan and is currently working on her first book of poetry.

Outside the Door

Robert Cording has published eight collections of poems, most recently Only So Far (CavanKerry Press, 2015) and A Word in My Mouth: Selected Spiritual Poems (Wipf and Stock, 2013). He has received two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships in poetry and two poetry grants from the Connecticut Commission of the Arts. His poems have appeared in numerous publications such as the Nation, the Southern Review, Poetry, the Hudson Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Orion, and the New Yorker.

Speak to Me

Marianne Boruch’s ten poetry collections include the recent title The Anti-Grief (Copper Canyon Press, 2019). She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia last year at the University of Canberra’s International Poetry Studies Institute, observing the astonishing wildlife to write a book-length sequence, a neo-ancient/medieval bestiary, which is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. The poems in this issue are a part of that collection.

What’s Wrong with Me?

The end of the world

is not what’s wrong with me.

 

Old age, illness, and death

are not wrong. They just are.

 

A stone says, Wake up,

exactly this is all there is!

 

Everything says it—

 

Chase Twichell’s most recent book is Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New & Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010), which won both the Kingsley Tufts Award from Claremont Graduate University and the Balcones Poetry Prize. A new book, Things as It Is, is forthcoming from Copper Canyon in 2018.

Driving the West Desert at Night

Lance Larsen is a former poet laureate of Utah and the author of five collections, most recently What the Body Knows (Tampa Press, 2017). He has won a number of awards, including a Pushcart Prize and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. A professor at BYU, he recently co-directed a theater study abroad program in London.

The Proposal

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.