A Gathering of Literary Tribes: “Small” Magazine Anthologies (on Best of Prairie Schooner: Fiction and Poetry, edited by Hilda Raz; Best of Prairie Schooner: Personal Essays, edited by Hilda Raz and Kate Flaherty; A Fine Excess: Fifty Years of The Beloit Poetry Journal, edited by Marion K. Stocking; The Body Electric: America’s Best Poetry from the American Poetry Review, edited by Stephen Berg, David Bonanno, and Arthur Vogelsang; and Three special issues of Poetry East [boxed set], edited by Richard Jones

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

“It Can Take Awhile Until You Sound Like Yourself”: A Review of Recent Poetry Chapbooks (on Hands-On Saints by Holly Iglesias; Cooking in Key West by Ed Ochester; The Genuine Negro Hero by Thomas Sayers Ellis; The Spirit of Blue Ink by Walter Pavlich; Freight by Sondra Upham; and Against Elegies by Jack Ridl)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

It’s a Long, Long Story (on Prize Stories 2001: The O.Henry Awards, edited by Larry Dark; Margot by Kevin Stewart; Not: A Trio by David Huddle; Beasts by Joyce Carol Oates; Rot by Janet Kauffman; Big as Life: Three Tales for Spring by Maureen Howard; and The Body Artist by Don DeLillo)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

What It All Means (on The Force of Spirit by Scott Russell Sanders; Shaped by Wind and Water: Reflections of a Naturalist by Ann Haymond Zwinger; and Writing the Sacred into the Real by Alison Hawthorne Deming)

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

The Personal Essay in the World (on My Misspent Youth by Meghan Daum; Cold Snap as Yearning by Robert Vivian; and Halls of Fame by John D’Agata

on In-Yer-Face Theatre: British Drama Today by Aleks Sierz

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

American Theater Watch, 2001–2002

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Whitman Pinch-Hits, 1861

Primer of Words