The Sound That Comes from Character: An Interview with Louis Simpson on the Life and Poetry of James Wright

Jonathan Blunk is a poet, essayist, and radio producer. His works include the authorized biography James Wright: A Life in Poetry (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2017) and the essay “ ‘Living Toward That Voice’: James Wright Transfixing and Transfixed,” which appeared in The Georgia Review (Winter 2017). Blunk’s work can also be found in such journals as the American Poetry Review, Poets & Writers, and FIELD magazine.

The True Shape of Poetry: A Reading and a Conversation

Warring Memories

The Invisible Is Not Lost

Susan Ludvigson, Professor Emerita at Winthrop University, was the 2014 winner of the James Dickey Prize for Poetry from Five Points magazine. She has published eight collections of poems with LSU Press, including Escaping the House of Certainty (2006). The first line of “Dead,” appearing here, is the title of her next collection. Most recently, her poems can be found in the Yale Review and the Southern Review.

I Would Trade Places with Your Death

Escape

Thinking About Love (on Orpheus and Eurydice by Gregory Orr; Against Love Poetry by Eavan Boland; The Other Life by Andrea Hollander Budy; The Tether by Carl Phillips; The Seven Ages by Louise Glück; Given Sugar, Given Salt by Jane Hirshfield; and Vectors: Aphorisms and Ten-Second Essays by James Richardson)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

This Point in Space and Time (on The Boy with the Thorn in His Side: A Memoir by Keith Fleming; Honky by Dalton Conley; Dreaming of Columbus: A Boyhood in the Bronx by Michael Pearson; Winning the Dust Bowl by Carter Revard; and Cidermaster of Rio Oscura by Harvey Frauenglass)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Knit One, Purl Two (on Who Is My Neighbor? by Minta Sue Berry; Yellow by Don Lee; The Hunger Bone: Rock and Roll Stories by Debra Marquart; Faithless: Tales of Transgression by Joyce Carol Oates; and My Lord Bag of Rice: New and Selected Stories by Carol Bly)