Impermanent Man

Kent Nelson has identified 767 species of North American birds and has traveled to the most remote areas of the U.S. and Canada, including Attu (the last Aleutian Island), the Dry Tortugas, and Newfoundland. His story collection, The Spirit Bird (University of Pittsburgh Press), won the 2014 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. “Out of the Darkness” is one of seven linked works in a collection-in-progress, “Charleston Stories,” three of which have appeared in The Georgia Review. He lives in Ouray, Colorado.

Creekboy

Joe Wilkins is the author of a memoir, The Mountain and the Fathers: Growing Up on the Big Dry (Counterpoint, 2013), winner of a 2014 GLCA New Writers Award—an honor that has previously recognized early work by the likes of Richard Ford, Louise Erdrich, and Alice Munro. He also has three books of poems, most recently When We Were Birds (University of Arkansas Press, 2016), winner of the 2017 Stafford/Hall Prize in Poetry from the Oregon Book Awards. His debut novel, And Ever These Bull Mountains, will be published by Little, Brown in the spring of 2018. Wilkins lives with his family in western Oregon, where he teaches writing at Linfield College.

The Calamity Prayer

Go West, young man: the first commandment of American dogma, and the last. Lewis and Clark heeded it in 1804, Kerouac and Cassidy in 1947. On foot or horse or motorcycle, in steamboat or convertible, we the people, as …

Mairead Small Staid is the 2017–18 George Bennett Fellow at Phillips Exeter Academy, where she is at work on her first book. Her poems and essays have appeared in AGNI, the Believer, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.

Transition: The Renaming of Hope

I will miss Anne, with the well-placed e and easy shape. Steep climb, perfect point, and the slide into the runout of three short, round letters. The way the letters smooth across the page in a tiny creek of …

Molly Cooney is a queer writer, mother, and teacher who spends as much time as possible outdoors. Her work can be found in the Gettysburg Review and the North Dakota Quarterly, among others, and she is a winner of The Loft Literary Center Mentor Series Award and the University of Arizona Poetry Center Manuscript Award. Cooney recently finished a manuscript about leading an Arctic canoeing expedition and is currently writing about life with her trans partner. She lives in Minneapolis, where she teaches writing.

Bad Books

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.

on Storming the Gateway by Fairfax Downey

on The Right of Assembly and Association by Glenn Abernathy

on Swift’s Classical Rhetoric by Charles Allen Beaumont

on Patriotic Gore by Edmund Wilson