Ten Letters

Praise the Winters Gone: Introduction to a Selection of Ten Letters by James Wright

Jonathan Blunk is a poet, essayist, and radio producer. His works include the authorized biography James Wright: A Life in Poetry (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2017) and the essay “ ‘Living Toward That Voice’: James Wright Transfixing and Transfixed,” which appeared in The Georgia Review (Winter 2017). Blunk’s work can also be found in such journals as the American Poetry Review, Poets & Writers, and FIELD magazine.

The Napkin

Cathy Smith Bowers’ collections of poetry include Like Shining from Shook Foil (2010), The Candle I Hold Up to See You (2009), and A Book of Minutes (2004), and her poems have appeared in publications such as Poetry, the Southern Review, Kenyon Review, and Ploughshares. For many years the poet-in-residence at Queens University of Charlotte, Bowers currently teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Queens and in the Haden Institute Spiritual Direction and Dream Leadership programs. From 2010 to 2012, she was poet laureate of North Carolina.

on The Two Roads Taken by Dannie Abse

Robert Schnall lives in Cleveland, Ohio, and has been reviewing poetry books for many years. His work has appeared in Boston Review, Harvard Review, and the Missouri Review.

on The Solid Form of Language by Robert Bringhurst

on On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt

on Running with the Bulls by Valerie Hemingway

on Hatchet Jobs: Writings on Contemporary Fiction by Dale Peck

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

Hello, Sky (on Primer for Non-Native Speakers by Philip Metres; October by Louise Glück; Festival Bone by Karen Rigby; The Everyday Apocalypse by David Thomas Lloyd; Metropolitan Bird Culture by Becky Peterson; Water Stories by Brighde Mullins; Sinners in the Hands: Selections from the Catalog by Ann Killough; and Most Wanted by Muriel Nelson)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.